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to give in

Discussion in 'English Only' started by rambopark, Feb 24, 2013.

  1. rambopark Senior Member

    South Korea
    KOREAN
    Greeting!
    It's about an prison drama. I'm really confused about the phrase verb 'to give in'.
    I've already found that sense out on the web, but most pages are saying that means "to submit, to hand in" or "to yield, to admit defeat". But there's something I don't understand in this script.

    In drama, someone was working very hard, but the other man came and talked to him like this:
    "You see, sometimes, no metter how hard you try, it just won't give in."

    The part I don't get it is "won't", basically, in this context, if I think "to give in" means "to yield, to admit defeat", it doesn't make sense for me. If that sentence was "it just give in.", I'd understand that.
    I'm very confused now. Please help me.
    Thanks :>
     
  2. Miss Julie

    Miss Julie Senior Member

    Chicago metro area
    English-U.S.
    "Won't" = "will not."
     
  3. rambopark Senior Member

    South Korea
    KOREAN
    I know, but what exactly does "give in" mean in that context?
     
  4. lucas-sp Senior Member

    English - Californian
    "No matter how hard you try" = "Even though you try really, really hard."

    Sometimes, no matter how hard you try - despite your hardest efforts - you can't get what you want. It "will not give in."
     
  5. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    To be able to answer your question, I think we need to know what "it" refers to in "it just won't give in". Presumably it refers to a noun that appears earlier in the dialogue.
     
  6. Giorgio Spizzi Senior Member

    Italian
    If the subject is an "it", then I'm afraid the meanings "to submit, to hand in, to admit defeat" won't do.

    For "You see, sometimes, no matter how hard you try, it just won't give in" the only possibility I can think of is "yield".
    We have to do with some physical effort, then.

    GS
     
  7. rambopark Senior Member

    South Korea
    KOREAN
    Here's all script :>

    ( A is making a hole to break the concrete. B is just A's mate. )
    A: It's called the Hooker law. It says that if you poke the exact right hole in something big and strong, it gets very weak. When the wall is weak, we can take it down. At least that's the plan.

    B: Yeah, it's always the plan. You should never underestimate the wall. You see.. sometimes, no matter how hard you try, it just won't give in.
     
  8. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Thanks. I now think that the "it" that I asked about stands for "the wall", so "it just won't give in" means "it just won't yield" (to the men's efforts to demolish it), I reckon.
     
  9. rambopark Senior Member

    South Korea
    KOREAN
    Finally, I understood much better. You're telling me "it" means "the wall", so that means the same with "the wall won't give in." right?, but it's so weird to tell like that, just say "it" as a noun instead of "the wall"??????
     
  10. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    It's not weird at all; it's utterly normal. "The wall" is the first noun you come to if you go back from the pronoun "it"; A will not be confused by what B says.
     
  11. rambopark Senior Member

    South Korea
    KOREAN
    Thanks you very much for your good explanation. :)
     

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