To miss someone

Discussion in 'English Only' started by aymouma, Jun 3, 2007.

  1. aymouma New Member

    UK, English
    One of the Oxford Dictionary's definitions for the word "miss" is to "notice or feel the loss or absence of". It always seemed to me that you could only miss somebody or something that you had been accustomed to having with you. However, I've been giving this some thought and I'm wondering whether it is actually possible to "miss" somebody without having seen them. This doesn't seem to be ruled out by the dictionary's definition. What do you think?
     
  2. Olympia28 Senior Member

    Australia, English
    That's really interesting...like the dictionary definition, I would assume you can only 'miss' something that you have experienced before, therefore wanting the same experience/feeling/person to be with you again...haha I feel like I'm talking in circles...but how can you miss something/someone if you've never had it/them?
     
  3. nichec

    nichec Senior Member

    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    But you sure can miss someone you have talked to online, even though you have never seen/met them....

    Welcome to the forum, aymouma:)
     
  4. dn88 Senior Member

    pl
    SOURCE
    SOURCE
    I also say that it's quite impossible to miss something without experiencing it first. :)
     
  5. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Interesting...


    My made-up scenario:

    A and B are talking about the memories they are going to have after they come back from a summer camp (they are going to white-raft, parachute, and do many other exciting things, etc.)
    After the talk A says:
    This is going to be fun!
    I'll be missing it! (although, they haven't been to the camp yet he knows that the things he'll experience will be something that may not come back. On the other hand, the act of missing will take place after they come back from the camp...)


    Tom
     
  6. nichec

    nichec Senior Member

    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Yeah, that goes to "I'll miss you so much" (when you are saying goodbye to someone) as well.
     
  7. dn88 Senior Member

    pl
    But the sequence of actions is still the same:

    - "experiencing" first
    - "missing" second
     
  8. aymouma New Member

    UK, English
    thank you, nichec :):)

    ...and thanks to you all for your responses; some very interesting theories!
     
  9. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English

    "She pined for her first love...in her mind he would be riding a white stallion..."

    Sure, why not?

    "He missed the experience while growing up of having a dog; he was determined that his children not miss that too."

    Sure, why not?
     
  10. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Packard, I have been thinking how to put itsince I read this thread.:)

    I am also wondering if the following would be possible:
    A couple talks:
    Woman: I have to go to Australia for a month...
    Man: That's an awfully long time...
    I am already missing you.
    She hasn't left yet.


    Tom
     
  11. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English

    Sure, why not? It works.
     
  12. nichec

    nichec Senior Member

    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    I think it depends on where you are standing.
    From literature/art point of view, it's not impossible to miss or even fall in love with someone even before you meet them. It's sort of a way artists try to interpret/understand how can someone who's a stranger ten minutes ago becomes the meaning of your life ten minutes later. Call it coincidence or fate, and you are standing on two different sides here.


    Edit: You are more than welcome, aymouma, we all wish to see you often (other gentlemen are just too shy to say that)
     
  13. aymouma New Member

    UK, English
    Hehe, it's been a while, but thanks. I hope to see myself on here more often too :)
     

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