Toast or blessing

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by ppls-chmp, Dec 30, 2004.

  1. ppls-chmp New Member

    USA english
    Does anyone know what the italian toast for "may you live a hundred years" is? Thanks.
     
  2. Alfry

    Alfry Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    The italian toast is "cento di questi giorni"

    welcome
     
  3. lsp

    lsp Senior Member

    NY
    US, English
    In New York many Italians say "Cent'anni!" - is that "americanized"?
     
  4. paolorausch Senior Member

    Cape Coral, Florida, USA
    USA, English, Sicilianu
    In the north I hear "Cin, Cin", which i believe to be their own bastardisation of Cent'anni, which i believe is a bastardisation of "Cento anni", where-as in our bad americaniano the nouns flow together (perch'io..et cetera)

    I think it may be a southern thing, Italia should awaken soon...and they will know.

    Fratelli d'Italia, Italia s'è desta!
    (off topic, but what is the being of s'è...what two words does it combine?)
     
  5. muriel

    muriel Senior Member

    italia italiano
    Dear Paolo Rausch,
    I am sorry to be oblige to correct you: "cin cin" id derived from Portugese, it was a imitation of chinese way of speaking
     
  6. paolorausch Senior Member

    Cape Coral, Florida, USA
    USA, English, Sicilianu
    No need to be sorry, Thank you very much! I was very unaware, so when people at a table meet glasses and say Cin Cin...they are imitating the Chinese?

    also "id drived from Portugese" would be "Was derived from Portuguese", hope that helps a bit.
     
  7. muriel

    muriel Senior Member

    italia italiano
    Sorry for my mistakes, I read this on a Ehymological guide of italian newspaper "La Stampa"
     
  8. muriel

    muriel Senior Member

    italia italiano
    It must be also noticed that italian "cin cin" comes from english "chin chin".
     
  9. lsp

    lsp Senior Member

    NY
    US, English
    MSN Encarta says this about its origin: Late 18th century. From Chinese - qing qing.
     
  10. Silvia

    Silvia Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Yes, that's what I knew, it comes from the Chinese.
     
  11. TiffanyC Junior Member

    United States / English
    Umm, I just returned from Italy. When I asked why they say "Ching, ching" during a toast they explained that is was because of the sound champagne glasses make when they are brought together! I'm not aware of any Chinese origin - how would Italians (or even the Portuguese) have even come in contact with the Chinese? Trading? Why would that then become a sound associated with toasting and wishing good fortune? I need to see that encyclopedia article.

    Anyway, Chinese people don't even say this (yes, I am Chinese).
     
  12. paolorausch Senior Member

    Cape Coral, Florida, USA
    USA, English, Sicilianu
    The Portuguese controlled most of the Far-East during the Golden Age of Portugal that is where it could transfer over.
     
  13. tallakron New Member

    USA english
    Ever see Godfather II?? This is from the script:



    MICHAEL
    Cent' anni


    Everyone
    Cent' anni


    DEANNA
    What's "Chen dandy"?


    FREDO Cent' anni -- It means a hundred years.
     
  14. Le Peru

    Le Peru Senior Member

    Italy
    Italy - Umbria
    Non l'ho mai sentito, per cui penso che sì, sia "americanizzato". Al posto del simile in suono, ma non in concetto "cento di questi giorni".

    Per un brindisi (un toast) direi che oltre a "cin cin" e "cento di questi giorni!" c'è "alla salute!" che è diffusissimo e molto classico (e ha un senso compiuto al contrario che "cin cin").
    Ciao
     
  15. miniraffy Junior Member

    Italy, Italian
    S'è combines the two words si and è, where si is a "reflexive particle" (particella pronominale) and è is the third person of the verb to be (essere). A lot of italian verbs are reflexive.
     
  16. principessatessa New Member

    English


    Yes, the tradition of toasting to dinner (or thanking god for your food) is to tap your neighbor's glass, look them in the eye, and then say "Cin Cin" (pronounced, "chin chin" in English).

    The reason for this is because you need to include all five of your senses in the blessing of the meal. You LOOK at your neighbor, HEAR the glasses when they TOUCH, SAY cin cin, and then TASTE the drink when you sip it ;-)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 25, 2009
  17. Profalshrtist New Member

    English

    However that is a rough translation if I am correct that means "100 of these days" while the actual translation for May you live 100 years I think is:

    Possa tu vivere cento anni
     
  18. italtrav

    italtrav Senior Member

    Brooklyn
    English
    Like everything else Italian, it was brought from China by Marco Polo, of course.:)
     

Share This Page