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todo recto, derecho, directo

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by elchinitovaliente, Jun 18, 2012.

  1. elchinitovaliente

    elchinitovaliente Senior Member

    California, EEUU
    Standard Edited American English
    ¡Saludos! I am working on a project for my Spanish linguistics class. To really give authenticity to my work, I need to understand the common differences amongst Spanish-speaking countries. I'd like to know what you (as native speakers) prefer to say in a normal conversational setting. So, personally, which of the words listed would you find more fitting in your country of origin?


    todo recto
    derecho
    directo
     
  2. Almighty Egg

    Almighty Egg Senior Member

    Valencia, España
    English (British)
    I'm not a native, but I've lived in Spain for years and the one I hear most for "straight on" is "todo recto / sigue recto", or colloquially "todo tieso".

    You do mean in the context of "straight on" don't you?

    Cheers.
     
  3. vmag Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Spanish - Spain - Catalonia
    3 are commonly used in spain, they are used in 3 diferent contexts. Could you point one so I can choose? "Normal conversation setting is waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too generic"
     
  4. elchinitovaliente

    elchinitovaliente Senior Member

    California, EEUU
    Standard Edited American English
    Okay. Well in what context would each be used in Spain?
     
  5. vmag Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Spanish - Spain - Catalonia
    "Todo recto" when giving directions, nowhere else (or atleast without sarcasm/irony).
    "derecho" means straight or law studies, can be used when giving directions but is less correct than todo recto.
    "directo" means direct
     
  6. Cayenarama Senior Member

    Catalonia
    English-England
    The correct and most common form, when giving directions is 'todo recto'. When I was learning Spanish I often used to hear 'derecho'. I don't think it's correct but rather just a 'mispronunciation' of 'todo recto'. 'Derecho' really means 'straight up' and if in English you were to hear 'Go straight up' rather than '...straight ahead' you probably wouldn't even notice but that doesn't mean you would choose the former as a valid alternative to be learned and practised.
    'Directo' is just a synonym of 'recto' but I hardly, if ever, hear it used for giving directions.
     
  7. blasita

    blasita Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain (Madrid)
    What the context, please? I think this is essential in giving a proper answer to your question, and also a forum rule.

    Thank you.
     
  8. elchinitovaliente

    elchinitovaliente Senior Member

    California, EEUU
    Standard Edited American English
    OK. Well, the context is about giving directions.
     
  9. blasita

    blasita Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain (Madrid)
    Thanks. So, I'd use '(vaya) todo recto' (and I agree with the other foreros that 'derecho' is sometimes used by some speakers too, but I don't use it). Now, it might also depend on the specific sentence.
     

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