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Toilet woman

Discussion in 'Русский (Russian)' started by Encolpius, Mar 2, 2014.

  1. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    Hello, I think there is no precise English expression, but Germans say "Klofrau" and it is a typical phenomenon in Central Europe, as well. I bet you know that kind of older ladies attendants in public toilets, too. What do you call them in Russian? Thanks.
     
  2. flance_j Junior Member

    Russian
    There is no special term in Russia.
     
  3. ahvalj

    ahvalj Senior Member

    Indeed, there is no term I can think of. Pelevin, in his story about such a woman (http://pelevin.nov.ru/rass/pe-9son/1.html), uses no words other than «уборщица»: "cleaning woman" or, politically correctly, "cleaning manager".
     
  4. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    Interesting. No slang word?
     
  5. ahvalj

    ahvalj Senior Member

    Well, I have thought that I would probably call her «вахтёрша» when she is in her cabin and «уборщица» when she is cleaning the toilet. Otherwise, no idea.
     
  6. ahvalj

    ahvalj Senior Member

  7. Vulpio

    Vulpio New Member

    «Вахтёрша» sits at a checkpoint with a turnstile, often serves as a security guard, can earn money as a «уборщица» or yardman at the end and beginning of the shift. Likely «уборщица», if engaged only cleaning. Formerly known as " техничка " or "технический работник". "Технический работник" sounds more culturally. If someone is talking about, it's probably better to say WC worker at pay toilets, «уборщица» - free, public, so understandable. Specific concept does not exist, so you can call, whatever. But in some cases, having called «уборщица» can refill vocabulary Russian obscenities.)
     
  8. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    So I could call her "клозетная старушка"....
     
  9. Vulpio

    Vulpio New Member

    Behind the back, preferably in a whisper, remember they masterfully owned a mop and far hurl a wet rag.) A better learn her name and patronymic, and communicate preferably with respect if you see her quite often. "Уборщицы" vindictive.
     

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