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  1. Carlos_8790

    Carlos_8790 Junior Member

    New Jersey, USA
    United States/English
    A friend of mine gave me these:

    El cielo está enladrillado ¿Quién lo desenladrillará? El desenladrillador que lo desenladrille, buen desenladrillador será.

    Mi traduccíon: The sky is layed with bricks. Who will un-lay it? The de-layer of bricks that de-lays. A good de-layer he will be.

    Perhaps too literal

    y

    Podador que podas la parra ¿Qué parra podas? ¿Podas mi parra o tu parra podas? Ni podo tu parra ni mi parra podo, que podo la parra de mi tio Bartolo.

    Picker that picks the grapevine. What Grapevine do you pick? Do you pick mine or yours. I don't pick yours or mine, I pick the grapevine of my uncle Bartolo.

    Just curious, I know the challenge is more in saying it that knowing a meaning. Muchas Gracias a todos
     
  2. Búkarus

    Búkarus Senior Member

    Colombia, castellano
    Hi!
    It's a single letter more complex:
    El cielo está enladrillado ¿Quién lo desenladrillará? El desenladrillador que lo desenladrillare, buen desenladrillador será.

    It means kind of (sorry for my grammar):
    The sky is brick-coloured, who is going to un-brick-colour it? The un-brick-colourer that will un-brick-colour it, a good un-brick-colourer he will be.

    About uncle Bartolo's grapevine, I thought the english verb for "podar" was "to prune, cut".

    Bye.
     
  3. Xavignea Senior Member

    Madrid/BCN
    Spanish Spain
    Lo siento búkarus, pero en España el trabalenguas es correcto como lo escribía Carlos:

    El cielo está enladrillado ¿Quién lo desenladrillará? El desenladrillador que lo desenladrille, buen desenladrillador será.

    Salu2,

    Xavignea
     

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