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Traditions ejectivizing ק ט צ

Discussion in 'עברית (Hebrew)' started by trigel, Mar 18, 2013.

  1. trigel Senior Member

    English - US, Korean
    Were there ever active Hebrew pronunciation traditions where the emphatic consonants were realized as ejectives (maybe among Ethiopian and Georgian Jews)?
    (According to Wikipedia Georgian Jews pronounced ע as /q'/ under Georgian (which has ejective plosives and fricatives) influence so my first guess is that other consonants which were "pharyngealized" in Tiberian Hebrew were ejectives as well. Can anyone confirm or refute this?)

    (And sorry for the vanity, but I just prefer ejectivization over pharyngealization and this is why I would like to know if there is any historical basis at all for this little ejective fanboyism of mine during the period when Hebrew was Hebrew)

    [EDIT: Oh, Ethiopian Jews didn't have Hebrew as a liturgical language so that leaves only Georgian Jews and Ethiopian immigrant accent as candidates... no luck, right?]

    (http://jic.tau.ac.il/moreshet/reshuma.asp?key=1000934 suggests yes for ק ט = ejective vs כ ת = aspirate or fricative (at least word-initially and medially), but צ = /s/.
    That means "traditions ejectivizing ק ט צ" probably do not exist, and that I gotta pronounce כּ ת ע צ as /s q' tʰ kʰ/ from now on, LOL...)
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2013

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