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Transliteration of مبارك العلمي

Discussion in 'العربية (Arabic)' started by César Lasso, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. César Lasso Senior Member

    Madrid (España)
    castellano, España
    Hello!

    This author published his PhD dissertation in Casablanca:

    د / مبارك العلمي

    I guess the

    / د

    corresponds to "Dr."

    Since he should be Moroccan, I'll transliterate his name as M'barek. But I am not sure how to transliterate his family name: 'Alami? 'Ilmi?

    I haven't found the author neither at the Library of Congress nor on Worldcat.

    Can you please help me?
     
  2. Bakr Senior Member

    Arabic
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2013
  3. César Lasso Senior Member

    Madrid (España)
    castellano, España
    Thanks a lot, Bakr!

    :)
     
  4. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Would you really transliterate the name as it is pronounced in colloquial? I would personally go for the standard form "Mubarak".
     
  5. Bakr Senior Member

    Arabic
  6. César Lasso Senior Member

    Madrid (España)
    castellano, España
    Well, I respect a lot the Library of Congress' criteria - although I know they are not perfect.

    The point is that they did not have the author in this thread, but they had another Moroccan author from the books I am cataloguing. They transliterated that one as Zaki, M'barek.

    Come to think of it, I might use both transliterations in my record. Worldcat frequently does that. Something as follows:

    ʿAlamī, M'barek

    (Mubarak al-ʿAlamī)

    Furthermore - I would transliterate the Arabic female name as Fatima, but the famous Moroccan sociologist and writer prefers it as Fatema Mernissi.

    I've noticed Moroccans have a 'strong personality' for transliterating their own names. For example, Paul Bowles worked with a Moroccan creator of stories, Mohammed Mrabet (the family name is clearly adapted to Moroccan pronunciation):

    http://www.shelfari.com/books/555457/Love-with-a-Few-Hairs

    Another reason is that, despite the fact that they are an Arabized people, they do not feel a 100 % Arabs. Something funny was that a few years ago, a group of Moroccans nicknamed me «l-3arbi», because I would talk to them in fuS7à. Of course I should talk to them in fuS7à - I never had the chance to learn dialectal Arabic!
     
  7. Bakr Senior Member

    Arabic
    It's even better.
     

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