troisième mi-temps

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by Prisca22, Jul 16, 2008.

  1. Prisca22 Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English - USA
    Hi all you geniuses out there :D

    I'm translating several articles to appear in a picture book on St Barts. This article concerns a famous bar there called Le Sélect. The sentence giving me headaches is as follow:

    Sa terrasse est un lieu de rencontres où l’on se ressource en nouvelles du bord, troisième mi-temps et autres potins.

    I just can't find a word for troisième mi-temps. I read the 2 posts on the subject, but I don't even understand what the craic is in English = it must be Irish English or pre-Chaucer English or something.

    Here is my attempt: It’s sidewalk café is a meeting place where everybody can recharge their batteries in local news, relaxation??? and just plain gossip.

    Thanks in advance for the help.
     
  2. Quaeitur

    Quaeitur Mod'elle

    Lille, France
    French
    This has to do with sports: after the two halves (deux mi-temps) of a game are played, all the players meet in a pub and have drinks. This is the troisième mi-temps (literally third half)
     
  3. Grop

    Grop Senior Member

    Provence
    français
    A few topics addressing troisième mi-temps are already listed.

    It was originally about rugby, but today it can be after any sport (even one that is not divided into half-times).
     
  4. Prisca22 Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English - USA
    Thanks for your input. I understand the meaning. But how to translate it. Partying? Having fun? Chatting and drinking?
     
  5. sarah82 Senior Member

    Annecy, France
    French-France
    Hello Prisca,

    troisième mi-temps refers to the "party" after a rugby match or after soccer/football as far as I know (après les deux mi-temps du match, vient la troisième mi-temps).
    It usually involves a lot of drinking :)
    About the "craic", yes it is Irish English. "craic" is a word for "fun"
     
  6. mgarizona

    mgarizona Senior Member

    Phoenix, AZ
    US - American English
    In Golf, they say 'the nineteenth hole.'
     
  7. Prisca22 Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English - USA
    Perhaps I could say, "doing some nineteen hole drinking"? What do you think?
     
  8. Quaeitur

    Quaeitur Mod'elle

    Lille, France
    French
    After game drinking matches ?

    That way you keep the sport analogy, without having to be explicit about the nature of the sport.
     
  9. sarah82 Senior Member

    Annecy, France
    French-France
    Well, I don't know in the UK/US, but I'm afraid that in France golf is seen as a rather "chic" sport, and for some reason, I don't imagine a "nineteenth hole" as a "troisième mi-temps". "3ème mi-temps" being très très alcoolisée...
     
  10. Grop

    Grop Senior Member

    Provence
    français
    Je pense que c'est une bonne idée, mais je mettrais un tiret: after-game drinks.
     
  11. Prisca22 Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English - USA
    I just called the author for more details. She told me she used the expression more in the sense of "refaire le monde en buvant un coup".
     
  12. sarah82 Senior Member

    Annecy, France
    French-France
    It sounds weird to me to use troisième mi-temps for "refaire le monde en buvant un coup" since mi-temps definitely involves sport.
    Anyways, I liked Grop's "after-game drinks".
     
  13. Prisca22 Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English - USA
    I'll tell the author that you guys think that "troisième mi-temps" is strange to convey her meaning... You all seem to think that the expression cannot be used outside of a sports meanint, right?
    Meanwhile, what do you think of "discussing any old subject under the sun"?
     
  14. bh7 Senior Member

    Limestone City
    Canada; English
    Seems to fit the author's intent. Would have to be "any odd subject" though:

    ...where everyone can catch up on local news and gossip or linger over a few drinks to discuss any odd subject under the sun [discuss life and what's going on in the world].
     
  15. clairet

    clairet Senior Member

    London & Bordeaux
    England & English (UK version)
    In the UK, Prisca22's "old" would be correct and "odd" would be....odd :)
     
  16. Prisca22 Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English - USA
    Thanks BH7 and Bordeaux Wine. I'll go with the sentence above and stick with my "old". BH7, it's like saying, for instance, talking about the good old times.

    :)
     
  17. clairet

    clairet Senior Member

    London & Bordeaux
    England & English (UK version)
    I don't think it has to be old, literally. It's a sense of "old" which means "it doesn't matter what". Especially in a phrase like "any old thing under the sun" - it means "anything at all" you want to speak about.
     
  18. Prisca22 Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English - USA
    Sure Claret. Old as meaning any old thing, tout et n'importe quoi.
     
  19. Wopsy

    Wopsy Senior Member

    The garden of Ireland
    English - Ireland
    No apostrophe here!
     
  20. SwissPete

    SwissPete Senior Member

    94044 USA
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    If it involves reliving the game, there is a nice expression in AE: Monday morning quarterbacking (since it's normally done at work, there probably would be no drinking...) :mad:
     
  21. Prisca22 Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English - USA
    Thanks Wopsy for the grammar correction. I'm usually good in grammar. I was focusing on the troisième mi-temps and the "it's" slipped my fingers ... :confused:
     
  22. Prisca22 Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English - USA
    Thanks SwissPete for your input. And the expression IS interesting. But I think that in the context, it wouldn't work. Besides, the expression refers to American football which places the context even farther away. But thanks anyway. :)
     

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