Trump (= fart)

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Loob, Sep 15, 2009.

  1. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    I have just returned from my first visit to my new great-nephew in Derbyshire. Where I was unutterably delighted, not by the fact that Great-Nephew frequently breaks wind, but by the fact that his mother and father both call this activity "trumping".

    I grew up using "trump" instead of "fart" (both noun and verb), a fact which I had attributed to my Welsh parentage; I'd never heard anyone outside the immediate family using it. Now my nephew's wife tells me it's the usual term in Derbyshire, and I find it in the OED with no regional attribution - verb:
    noun:
    So, my question is:

    Is trump = fart in general use in (1) BrE (2) other varieties of English?





    Yes, this is a serious, academic question:p
     
  2. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    It's a new one for me. It must raise a lot of eyebrows in bridge circles where it is known.
     
  3. Imber Ranae Senior Member

    English - USA
    I've never heard of it either.
     
  4. mancunienne girl Senior Member

    England
    English - England
    "trumping" is common usage in the North of England....
     
  5. spatula

    spatula Senior Member

    London
    English - London (Irish ethnicity)
    I do it all the time. Use the word trump that is.
     
  6. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    Come to think of it, Donald Trump probably would object to such usage.
     
  7. se16teddy

    se16teddy Senior Member

    London
    English - England
  8. mancunienne girl Senior Member

    England
    English - England
  9. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    I never refer to pumping in any other way, Mrs.Serious-Academic-Loob.

    (The name 'Ivana Trump' always sets me off trumping laughing: I vanna trump. Serious academic point.)
     
  10. Kevin Beach

    Kevin Beach Senior Member

    I'd like to say that we don't do that sort of thing in the circles in which I move.

    But it wouldn't be true, so, yes, "trump" is not unknown.
     
  11. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    "Over here, on the left bank of the puddle, we don't use it," he tooted airily.
     
  12. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    You have no idea, mancunienne girl, spatula, teddy, ewie, KB, how grateful I am to know that I AM NOT ALONE. All my life, I thought I was an oddity; now I know that I'm just a Somerset-born-&-bred northerner.

    I wish you, forever, the wind beneath your wings....
     
  13. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    Is that, by chance, another Northerner term for the same thing? :)
     
  14. mancunienne girl Senior Member

    England
    English - England
    Yes, there is also another popular term in the northern part of England. Many males refer to said action as a "trouser cough".......
     
  15. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    :D:D:D Oh I've never heard that, MancGirl ~ I it: that's one to be noted, cherished, adored, cherished, remembered, and repeated :)rolleyes:) ad nauseam at all the high-tone Mancunian garden parties one is invited to.
     
  16. Ann O'Rack Senior Member

    UK
    UK English
    Trump is one of those raucous, noisy, farts of joy.

    I occasionally "puff" (at work, one doesn't want to announce too loudly the source of the noxious fumes) and have been known to let out the occasional "toot" or "parp", and kids do a "bottom-burp", but an honest-to-goodness trump is a true delight, when one can let rip with both cheeks vibrating, preferably (if you're my son) in the face of one's mother. Yuck.
     
  17. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    Perhaps just the littlest bit too much detail there, Anno:p
     
  18. bluegiraffe

    bluegiraffe Senior Member

    Nottingham, England
    English - England
    Hi guys, I have a question for US based forumees. Whilst watching The Apprentice USA last night, my other half couldn't believe that Donald Trump has never changed his name. I wondered if maybe trump doesn't have the same connotations in AE as it does in BrE? A trump in BrE being "the passing of wind".
     
  19. Bevj

    Bevj Allegra Moderata

    Girona, Spain
    English (U.K.)
    Heh I have never heard of that usage of the word 'trump'!
    I always associated it with superiority or winning. :) (e.g. playing a trump card).
     
  20. bluegiraffe

    bluegiraffe Senior Member

    Nottingham, England
    English - England
    Really?? Whereabouts in the UK are you from? I'm now wondering if it's regional?
     
  21. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    Trump has more than one AE meaning, but windbreaking isn't among them.

    Are you sure you didn't trump this up?
     
  22. bluegiraffe

    bluegiraffe Senior Member

    Nottingham, England
    English - England
    Nope! It is a polite way of saying the word, used by children and also some of us polite adults who don't like the "f" word and who are too common to say "break wind"!
     
  23. shawnee

    shawnee Senior Member

    Melbourne
    English - Australian
    Same here.
     
  24. bluegiraffe

    bluegiraffe Senior Member

    Nottingham, England
    English - England
    OK so the US and Australia are out. How about Canada, NZ, Ireland and other regions of the UK, I'm fascinated now!
     
  25. Kevin Beach

    Kevin Beach Senior Member

    "Trump" is surely the old-fashioned word for "trumpet", borrowed to describe the anatomical sound in question. There have even been those skilful enough to make a living of sorts from their ability to vary their ...... anal embrouchure, I suppose...... so as to play tunes. A sort of tonic solfart.
     
  26. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
     
  27. marquess Senior Member

    U.K.
    U.K. English
    New one on me (Bristol, UK), but I guess I might get it in context by association with 'Trumpet'.
     
  28. Kevin Beach

    Kevin Beach Senior Member

    I suppose it gices a wholly new meaning to "the last trump", which is said to be what will call all before the heavenly throne at the end of all things. So the universe not only started with a big bang but will end with one too.
     
  29. Bevj

    Bevj Allegra Moderata

    Girona, Spain
    English (U.K.)
    Well I'm interested enough to have searched for synonyms of 'trump' and nowhere have I found a reference to a fart.....
    Can anyone provide a link?
     
  30. bluegiraffe

    bluegiraffe Senior Member

    Nottingham, England
    English - England
    Urban Dictionary says:

    1. trump 144 up, 48 down[​IMG] [​IMG] get this on a mug [​IMG] or greeting card
    Northern to midlands slang for a fart, expelling of wind from the anus.
    Oi who trumped?
    Urrgh yuck the dogs gone and trumped again.


    It must be regional! Where's Soundshift to back me up?
     
  31. GreenWhiteBlue

    GreenWhiteBlue Senior Member

    New York
    USA - English
    Incidentally, while Donald Trump never changed his name, Donald's grandfather did change his own name. After arriving in the US from Germany, the man who was born as Friedrich Drumpf changed his name to the similar-sounding, but less odd (in English) "Frederick Trump."
     
  32. out2lnch Senior Member

    Ottawa, Canada
    English-Canada
    Sorry, I've never heard it either. It is funny, though, how oddly appropriate his name is with this meaning . . .
     
  33. Bevj

    Bevj Allegra Moderata

    Girona, Spain
    English (U.K.)
    Well!
    And I'm a Midlander, too.....

    Thanks for the info!
     
  34. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Trump=fart is not known naturally in this part of the world, but I have come across it as an import from the north-east of England - York in particular.
     
  35. lablady

    lablady Senior Member

    Central California
    English - USA
    Trump = fart is not known in my part of the world either, but I think I would understand it in context.

    I guess the take-away lesson from this is that "The Donald" would be well-advised to not take up residence in certain regions. :)
     
  36. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    Moderator doodah: Thread merged with previous one on same subject.

    As I said in post #9 above, I always find the former Mrs.Trump's name particularly amusing.
     
  37. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    I'd sure never heard it before in my neck of the woods. Now that I have, I'll likely sneak it in the next time such a topic is up for discussion. My great favorite, however, is "trouser cough". Thank you, forum members.
     
  38. Aaar

    Aaar Senior Member

    New Jersey
    English -USA
    I have to say, again, I always thought this was the reason Nellie the Elephant was such a funny/popular song. :)
     
  39. pickarooney

    pickarooney Senior Member

    Provence, France
    English (Ireland)
    I've used it, though it would probably be categorised as a Britishism. I prefer bum-trumpet myself.
     
  40. bluegiraffe

    bluegiraffe Senior Member

    Nottingham, England
    English - England
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2009

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