Try or try out (verb)

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by Mo0nSt3r, Jan 9, 2013.

  1. Mo0nSt3r

    Mo0nSt3r Junior Member

    Yesterday I was perusing the forum and I came across with a post, where some people were discussing whether could be possible to use "try" without a verb ahead of it.

    Example: I tried my bike on my way to my friend´s flat.

    I tried out my bike on my way to my friend´s flat

    They were saying that the first phrase does not make too much sense so you should use either try+ another verb or try out or even try on( for clothes)
     
  2. Annalees Senior Member

    Hello,


    I'm not sure what your post is about... What is your question, exactly?

    Are you asking us our opinion on another post??
     
  3. Robañero Senior Member

    SE Wisconsin, USA
    American English
    I think technically you cannot try a bike. You can, however, try riding a bike. It's splitting hairs, everyone says "try a bike", "try a food item", but you try a verb, not a noun. "test a bike", or "taste a food item" would be more proper.
     
  4. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    I agree that the first sentence sounds odd. The second one is fine, and means either riding the bike for the first time after buying it, or testing it after having it repaired. To try out something means to test it and see if it is satisfactory.
     
  5. Mo0nSt3r

    Mo0nSt3r Junior Member

    Ok thanks that was what I was asking for. I also wanted to clarify my ideas with the verb "try sth out", when i have to use it? or it means exactly the same that try out sth?
     
  6. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    Son iguales.
     
  7. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    El significado es el mismo, pero el sintaxis varia un poco con los pronombres:
    I tried out my bike on my way to my friend´s flat.
    I tried my bike out on my way to my friend´s flat.
    I tried it out on my way to my friend´s flat.
    I tried out it on my way to my friend´s flat.
     

Share This Page