1. patrickr Senior Member

    canada, english
    Does anyone have a link to some information so I can better understand the word and usage of 'tsu' in Quebecois french.

    For example, ça peux-tsu?

    thanks.
     
  2. Iznogoud

    Iznogoud Senior Member

    French - Canada
    The proper French for this would be "Cela ce peut-il?". "Tu" is often (mistakenly, as far as I'm concerned) added at the end of a sentence to transform it into an interrogation. So, the affirmation "ça se peut" becomes a questions if you say "ça se peut-tu?". That is typically Canadian, but there is an archaic equivalent in France which has "ti" instead of "tu" added at the end of the sentence. In any case, this formulation is only used in very relaxed conversational style.

    The other part of your question is related to the way many people in Québec pronounce a strong "s" or "z" after a "d" or "t" when it is followed by a vowel. It is not a mistake to do that in French, but it becomes one when it is exaggerated, which is often the case around here.
     
  3. patrickr Senior Member

    canada, english
    OK, cause i've seen it as tsu in 'apeak quebec'. So if I add tsu or tu as you say it makes it a question? even if the quesrion wouldn't have a 'you' in it?
     
  4. Iznogoud

    Iznogoud Senior Member

    French - Canada
    So, just to be clear, even though the "s" is pronounced (as in "tsu"), it is never written. And to answer your question, yes, adding "tu" after a verb in virtually any affirmative sentence transforms it into a question. Again, you'd never write it that way (unless you used the archaic French "ti"), you'd only hear it in (poor) conversation.
     
  5. patrickr Senior Member

    canada, english
    ok great. and there are no other use for tu in the 'tsu' sense?
     
  6. Sickduck Senior Member

    Montreal, Quebec (Canada)
    French - Canada
    Iznogoud, I think the question refers to tsu = tu sais [tsé] = you know. A lot of sentences in Québécois end with «tsé». A sort of oral tic, similar to «you know» or «like» in English.
     
  7. Iznogoud

    Iznogoud Senior Member

    French - Canada
    Good point, I hadn't thought of that.

    Again, you wouldn't write "tsé", you'd write "tu sais".
     
  8. [Marc] Senior Member

    French France
    And you'd never use it in france, I think... I didn't know that particularity (-ism ?), interesting...

    Marc
     
  9. charcholle Senior Member

    Bristol UK
    French France
    'tse' at the end of sentences is actually used, at least in the Loire and the Ardeche. It is used a lot there actually .. It is neither very correct nor very elegant though...!!
     
  10. patrickr Senior Member

    canada, english
    I don't think in the sense I'm using it means tu sais.

    t'as-tsu
    tu peux-tsu
    s'tu pour le vrai

    are some examples in speak quebec of this word.
     
  11. [Marc] Senior Member

    French France
    charcholle:
    Coment l'utilisez-vous ... ? Dans le sens de "sais-tu ?" "tu sais ?"
     
  12. Iznogoud

    Iznogoud Senior Member

    French - Canada

    Perfect examples of my original explanation.
     
  13. charcholle Senior Member

    Bristol UK
    French France
    oui c'est plus ou moins dans le sens de 'tu sais', mais c'est surtout utilise pour ponctuer, pour insister. Par exemple, "il y a le marche, j'ai du me garer au bout de la rue t'sais". 'T'sais' est utilise ici pour montrer que la personne n'est pas contente de s'etre garee au bout de la rue. Je pense que ca se rapproche du 'quoi' ajoute a la fin des phrases dans le Sud de la France.
    Je ne suis pas sure que mon explication soit tres claire...
     
  14. [Marc] Senior Member

    French France
    ça me va... je connaissais le "quoi", je m'en sers même parfois ;), mais le t'sais dans ce sens là... disons autre qu'interrogatif est plus nouveau. C'est marrant les habitudes locales...
     
  15. charcholle Senior Member

    Bristol UK
    French France
    Pour sur... ;)
     

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