tuna (fruto del nopal)

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by labrapalabras, Dec 6, 2007.

  1. labrapalabras Senior Member

    Currently in Mexico, DF
    Mexico, Spanish
    ¡Hola! En México le llamamos "tuna" al fruto del cactus llamado "nopal". ¿Alguien sabe cómo se dice en inglés? ¡Gracias!
     
     
  2. SDLX Master

    SDLX Master Senior Member

    Lima, Peru
    Spanish - Peru
    Es igual, la fruta es tuna.
     
  3. loladamore

    loladamore Senior Member

    Zacatecas, México
    English UK
  4. bobobaby Senior Member

    USA English
    Prickly pears
     
  5. labrapalabras Senior Member

    Currently in Mexico, DF
    Mexico, Spanish
    Prickly pear! ¡Lo había escuchado y no lo recordaba! Muchas gracias.
     
  6. toromiel New Member

    Mexican Spanish
    Que tal....
    Podrian ayudarme a traducir en ingles la palabra Tuna, que es la fruta del nopal.
    Gracias.
     
  7. pipcr2 Senior Member

    Spain - Spanish
  8. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    In the grocery store they're called nopal or cactus paddles, or sometimes prickly pear.
     
  9. yaaxtoloc

    yaaxtoloc Junior Member

    Mexico City
    Mexican Spanish
    prickley pears
     
  10. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod, I say, Moderator

    Arizona
    American English
    "Prickly pear cactus" es el nombre del nopal, no de su fruto, la tuna.

    Culturalmente, se desconoce la tuna entre los angloparlantes. Lo más cercano en inglés sería prickly-pear fruit o the fruit of the prickly pear cactus.
     
  11. scotu Senior Member

    Paradise: LaX.Nay.Mex.
    Chicago English
    Nopales is the term for the stem of the cactus. (Nopal means cactus in Spanish.)The "leaves or pads" when they are cut up and used in salsa and salad are called "nopalitios"
    Tuna (prickly pears) is the fruit of the same cactus plant. Tuna looks a little like a purple kiwi when you see it in the stores.

    Here's a picture:
    http://www.cactuslovers.com/pricklypearcactus-photo.htm

    Note: the Spanish word for tuna (the fish) is "Atun"
    And thanks to the moderator that changed the title thus leading me to learn the difference between fruta and fruto.

     
    Last edited: May 30, 2009
  12. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    Wait, what's the difference between fruto and fruta??
     
  13. Roberto_Mendoza

    Roberto_Mendoza Senior Member

    Michoacán, México
    Spanish - México
    According to the DRAE, the "futo" is a larger category to which "fruta" belongs, the difference being that "fruta" is an edibe "fruto", or at least that's how I understand it.

    Addittionally, I liked Scotu's picture, but the actual edible "tuna" or prickly pear fruit is more like this or this. Cheers.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2009
  14. carioquita Senior Member

    Baja California
    México.---Spanish
    Hi !
    Prickly pear es nopal
    y siempre he escuchado a los norteamericanos decirle a la fruta del nopal "tuna" tal y como la decimos en español.

    Estoy de acuerdo en la contestación de Roberto Mendoza.

    Un saludo
    Carioquita.:idea:
     
  15. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    The fruit, la tuna, which is roughly pear-shaped and definitely prickly, is called a "prickly pear". The whole prickly pear plant, or prickly pear cactus, el nopal, can also be called a "prickly pear" just as a whole rose bush can be called a "rose".
     
  16. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Agree. Prickly pear cactus. Chumbera.
    Already in this thread (and others):
    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1248721&highlight=chumbera


    Frutos secos (nuts) are also edible.
    "Fruto" can also be used for "fruit" in a metaphoric sense, as in "fruit of one's labours".
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2009
  17. carioquita Senior Member

    Baja California
    México.---Spanish
    ======================================================

    Forero:
    I am sorry but I do not think that you can call a rose bush "rose"
    rose bush is the plant, and rose is the flower....
    rosal= rose bush or rose plant; rose garden, multiflora rose ; but not "rose" alone for the plant.

    and nopal, yes you are right is prickly pear....and the fruit, tuna is also called "TUNA" in english.-

    good night.
    Carioquita.
     
  18. elirlandes

    elirlandes Senior Member

    Dublin & Málaga
    Ireland English
    This fruit is known as "chumbo" in southern Spain.
     
  19. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod, I say, Moderator

    Arizona
    American English
    I don't know much about roses, because none grow outside my house. However, I've never heard a rose bush called a "rose" -- the plant is always called a rose bush, and an individual flower on that bush is called a rose.

    The same is true of prickly pear cactus, which do grow outside my house. The plant is called a prickly pear, the flower is called a prickly pear flower, and the fruit is called a prickly pear fruit.

    Here's what wikipedia says on the subject:
     
  20. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    In the DRAE, one name for the plant is higuera (fig tree) chumba
    and one name for the fruit is higo (fig) chumbo.

    chumbera.
    (De chumbo).
    1. f. higuera chumba.

    chumbo1, ba.
    □ V.
    higo chumbo

    higuera chumba
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2009
  21. SydLexia Senior Member

    London
    UK, English
    In the UK at least a "rose" can be a plant, a flower, or a variety (cultivar). I have a rose in the garden called "Buff Beauty" that produces masses of roses... (and it's just about to flower).

    I think I've heard "prickly pears" (the fruit) called "higos chumbos" in Spain and the plant a "chumbera".

    syd
     
  22. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    More to the point than rose for a "rose bush" is "Bradford pear" for a Bradford pear tree and "Bartlett pear" for a Bartlett pear tree. A pawpaw is also both a fruit and the tree on which it grows:

    Don't pick the prickly pear by the paw.
    When you pick a pear, try to use the claw.
    But you don't need to use the claw
    When you pick a pear of the big pawpaw.

    - from Walt Disney's The Jungle Book.
     
  23. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    Well, normally you would say rosebush, but you could also say rose: "I ordered a new hybrid yellow rose from Jackson & Perkins"
     
  24. scotu Senior Member

    Paradise: LaX.Nay.Mex.
    Chicago English
    éste es el fruto de mi trabajo: (fruto = results )

    This is obvious: La naranja es una fruita.
    This was the suprise: La naranja es el fruto (the product) del najanjo (of an orange tree).

    fruto is also the botanical categorie which includes nuts
    also used for dried fruits and nuts. (fruto seco)
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2009
  25. carioquita Senior Member

    Baja California
    México.---Spanish
    I agree with FENIXPOLLO about the tuna and mostly about the ROSE.

    Carioquita. :D
     
  26. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    I think the usage must be regional. Where I live people do call the fruits prickly pears, not prickly pear fruits, and the plant is normally called a prickly pear cactus. Here we only use "prickly pear" by itself for the plant in a botanical context (where we would use "a rose" for a rosebush or "a walnut" for a walnut tree).
     
  27. loladamore

    loladamore Senior Member

    Zacatecas, México
    English UK
    I don't agree that the usage is regional because I agree with your usage!
    I grew up in the UK, where we had roses, a term my parents and grandparents applied to both the flower and the bush/plant.
    I first came across nopales and tunas in the south of Italy where I was informed by my mother (who studied botany at a UK university) that these Italian fighi d'India (of Mexican origin) were called prickly pears in English, and that the name could refer to both the plant/tree and the fruit.
    Prickly pear cactus would be the fuller name for the plant/tree.
    And now I have various kinds of Opuntia both right outside my house and in my fridge. Yum.

    Saludos
     
  28. eseese Junior Member

    México, español
    what is a little confusing to me, is that in mexico we have "tunas" (and there are many kinds of them: green, purple, xoconostle, for instance), which grow in the nopal, and we have "higos", which grow in a bush, and according to this thing higo is also called prickly pear?
     
  29. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod, I say, Moderator

    Arizona
    American English
    Do you mean the wordreference.com dictionary? It says that higo is translated as fig; and it lists "higo chumbo" as "prickly pear". The translation of "higo" is correct, although I've never heard "higo chumbo".
     
  30. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    "Higo chumbo" must be confined to the Eastern side of the Atlantic. It's used here and here, with reference to other names as being used in the Americas.
    Evidentemente, eseese, no tiene nada que ver con los higos de higueras, ni "pickly pear" tiene nada que ver con las peras de peral, son sólo nombres. Recuerda que la papa, o patata, en francés y holandés (y a lo mejor en más idiomas) es "manzana de tierra" (pomme de terre, aardappel).
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2010

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