tyylikäs, aistikas, elegantti, hieno

Discussion in 'Suomi (Finnish)' started by Maabdreo, Jan 16, 2014.

  1. Maabdreo

    Maabdreo Junior Member

    English - USA
    Google Translate lists all of these as translations for "elegant." The definitions seem similar. Is there much of a difference in meaning? What word would you most likely to use to describe, for instance, an elegant


    • dinner
    • turn of phrase
    • person
    • mathematical proof
    • table

    Thanks for your help!
     
  2. Gavril Senior Member

    English, USA
    Hi Maabdreo,

    I'm not a native speaker, but I'll take a crack at your question because there haven't been any responses yet.

    Here is how I understand the terms you mentioned:

    - tyylikäs means "stylish"; it's derived from tyyli "style" + the suffix -käs

    - aistikas is derived in the same way from the noun aisti "sense", so it suggests that a person is very sensitive (in a good way) to style or other criteria, or -- if used with a non-human object -- reflective of such sensitivity.

    The first meaning listed at the suomisanakirja.fi dictionary for aistikas is "hyvää makua osoittava" "displaying good taste".

    - elegantti is defined at suomisanakirja.fi as synonymous with tyylikäs and aistikas, but another definition is "näppärä, nokkela", i.e., "clever".

    - hieno means "fine" in the sense of "sophisticated" and/or "excellent"

    With this in mind, I would guess that:

    • dinner

      tyylikäs / aistikas / elegantti / hieno would all work, but tyylikäs/aistikas would have the more specific meaning of "stylish/tasteful"

    • turn of phrase

      hieno or elegantti

    • person

      All four could work here, but tyylikäs / aistikas would mean a stylish/tasteful person, hieno or elegantti would mean a more generally "elegant" person, and hieno ihminen could also simply mean "a fine person"

    • mathematical proof

      hieno or elegantti

    • table

      Again, all four adjectives would probably work, but they wouldn't all mean the same thing (as in the case of "person").

    Hopefully the native speakers will add to (or correct) the above if needed.
     
  3. Määränpää

    Määränpää Senior Member

    Finnish
    I don't know about other native speakers, but to me aistikas (and it's twin aistillinen 'sensual') sound old-fashioned and comical.

    According to Wikipedia, tyylikäs is an option here. The word hieno is less specific.
     
  4. Maabdreo

    Maabdreo Junior Member

    English - USA
    Thanks for both answers!
     

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