undergo/get through

Discussion in 'English Only' started by loureed4, Apr 5, 2013.

  1. loureed4 Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    Hello,

    I am studying the verb "undergo", and I just made up this sentence because I think it could overlap with "get through" in this context:

    "At my age (78 years old) , I have already undergone/got through a lot of hardships."

    Could both verbs fit ?
     
  2. GMF1991 Senior Member

    Cork, Ireland
    English (UK, Suffolk)
    I wouldn't say that "got" is the same. If you said "gone through" then I would agree.

    Another example "undergo surgery" would be "go through surgery" and although the latter is not common, they do have the same meaning.

    :)
     
  3. loureed4 Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    Thanks!!

    Well, I meant the past participle of "get through" not "go through".
    Yes, I have seen that "undergo" is referred to surgery too, but also to difficulties in life, if I read well, hehe. :)
     
  4. GMF1991 Senior Member

    Cork, Ireland
    English (UK, Suffolk)
    I knew that you were looking for "get through", but undergo is not used for this. You can undergo changes in life, but personally Iwouldn't use it for hardships.

    "Get through", "experience" or "deal with" are more commonly used for contexts to do with hardships etc.

    :)
     
  5. loureed4 Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    I see...I am trying to understand you GMF1991. It is good to know a English native speaker´s point of view. Since I have just studied that verb, I was wondering that.

    Thanks a lot GMF!! .
     
  6. rhitagawr

    rhitagawr Senior Member

    Wales
    British English
    Personally I'd say experienced, although experiences aren't always bad. You could say suffer if you want to emphasise the unpleasantness of the hardships. Like GMF1991, I wouldn't say undergo. I agree with loureed4's comment about surgery. Undergo can refer to unpleasant things but it can also be more neutral - The city has undergone many changes in the past century.
    Get through implies some sort of struggle and achievement. I hope he gets through his exams. It would be nice if I could get through the night without waking up six times.
     
  7. loureed4 Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    Thanks rhitagawr, this was great:

    "...but it can also be more neutral - The city has undergone many changes in the past century.
    Get through implies some sort of struggle and achievement..." .

    That is a new nuance to me, that it can be neutral, and it is great to know!! . I agree, to my non-native mind "get through" implies difficulties, struggle, achievements...

    This new nuance is great to know, thanks a lot for it!
     

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