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unspoil (verb)

Discussion in 'Dictionary Additions' started by swift, Feb 17, 2011.

  1. swift

    swift Senior Member

    Spanish – Costa Rica (Valle Central)
    Term: (A word or expression you have seen in writing)

    unspoil verb (transitive)

    Your definition or explanation:

    1. To undo the effect of spoiling. 2. (Usually speaking of children) To undo the effect of over-indulgence in.

    Example: (An example of the term in use)

    Better than unspoiling your children is not spoiling them at all.

    One or more places you have seen the term: (Please give URLs/links to web pages, or a full description of a print publication.)

    Sense 1
    A 18th century example :D

    Sense 2

    Have you looked for this term or meaning in dictionaries, and not found it? Yes :tick:

    Found only in the Century Dictionary:


     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2011
  2. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    Hullo Don Swifty. Just a tiddlypiddly problem in that this is in the full OED (sense 1): it even gives exactly the same quote from Evelina:(

    Still, maybe sense 2 is new: I've certainly never heard it:)
     
  3. swift

    swift Senior Member

    Spanish – Costa Rica (Valle Central)
    Oh~:( I 'discovered', so to speak, the second sense this morning but I wouldn't say it's new... I guess sense 1 (as it appears in Evelina) is rare nowadays.

    :) Nice to see you, don Ewie.
     
  4. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    Actually, Swifty, I've just noticed that the only other quotation the OED gives could well be an instance of sense 2:
    From Helen (1834) by Maria Edgeworth. I don't know the book so can't say if Helen's spoilt-brat-spoilt or some-other-spoilt.
     
  5. swift

    swift Senior Member

    Spanish – Costa Rica (Valle Central)
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2011
  6. Myridon

    Myridon Senior Member

    Texas
    English - US
    It seems that this word has the obvious meaning of prefix + x.
    If that is the case, are there criteria for determining if it deserves a separate entry?
     

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