Urdu: شدت پسند

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by teaboy, Feb 10, 2012.

  1. teaboy Senior Member

    USA
    English
    What does شدت پسند mean in this sentence:

    القائدہ رہنما بدر منصور سمیت 4 شدت پسند جاں بحق ہو گۓ


    Good buddies? Tough dudes?
     
  2. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Extremists. They could also have been both "Good buddies" and "Tough dudes", but I don't have reliable information in this regard.:)
     
  3. teaboy Senior Member

    USA
    English
    Thanks, QP!
     
  4. teaboy Senior Member

    USA
    English
    How would you translate the rest of the sentence:
    القائدہ رہنما بدر منصور سمیت 4 شدت پسند جاں بحق ہو گۓ جبکہ طالبان کمانڈر نے رائٹرز کو بتایا کہ حملے میں بدر منصور بیوی اور خاندان کے 2 ارکان کے ہمراہ مارا گیا ہے۔
    Al-Qaeda leader Badr Mansour along with 4 extremists perished while Badr Mansour Bivi and 2 family supporters were killed.

    The part about two ارکان کے ہمراہ seems redundant. I mean, wouldn't supporters be companions? Or does it mean 2 companions of supporters were killed?
     
  5. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    ..while a taalibaan commander told Reuters that in the attack Badr Mansour has been/was killed with his wife and two (other) members of the family.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012
  6. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    shiddat pasand
    Let me guess: 'who likes greatness/enhancement...'.

    However, in the standard media jargon being used, 'extremist/extremophile'.
     
  7. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    Just on top of Qureshpor SaaHib's very good translation I'd like to add that the last part of your question, arkaan ke hamraah would preferably be araakiin ke hamraah.

    Also, ke hamraah, one can translate as accompanied by, together with.
     
  8. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Thank you for the (undeserved) compliment, marrish SaaHib.

    Ref: arkaan vs araakiin. I believe the latter, though used in Urdu, may be wrong. My Arabic dictionary only gives "arkaan" as the plural for "rukn". Platts also is in agreement with this. To support your side of the coin, Kitaabistaan's 20th Century Urdu-English dictionary gives both arkaan and araakiin.
     
  9. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    It was not a compliment but the mere statement of the fact, Qureshpor SaaHib.

    Of course I'm aware of rukn and arkaan in Arabic, and by no means I meant that arkaan is incorrect; I only said which usage would be preferable to me as per its usage in Urdu. I believe Kitaabistaan reflects the contemporary usage better than Platts does, in this regard. Good point to note, though.

    I think if we only refer to different dictionaries, this forum is of no use.
     
  10. teaboy Senior Member

    USA
    English
    You'll have to let the editors of Nawae Waqt know...
     
  11. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    It is a witty comment, thank, according to their record of many mistakes and spelling errors, they should really get a good editor, which I believe they don't have.

    My remark pertains to the general impression I have, not to arkaan, which is correct,

    thank you for the reference.
     
  12. teaboy Senior Member

    USA
    English
    I hope you don't take that comment as a snipe against you -- it was not meant that way!

    As a language learner, it is often difficult to know what is one's own linguistic shortcoming and what is incorrectly or poorly written, and I always assume the former.
     
  13. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Perhaps more like "extremeness-liker", "intensity/severity-lover".
     
  14. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi

    shiddat pasand
    is used as an alternative to intehaa pasand = extremist! ... and of course shiddat pasand is very different from tashaddud pasand (= tormentor / torturer) although shiddat and tashaddud have the same root Arabic: sh-d-d.

    shiddat literally means severity / vehemence / intensity etc. So shiddat pasand literally means "severity- / vehemence-liker" and we use it to mean an extremist = intehaa pasand - extreme = intehaa.
     
  15. Sheikh_14 Senior Member

    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    Precisely but since we in urdu don't have a set distinction between good and bad extremism that too highly infrequent but can be invoked with the suffix phile in english, is it possible to use either without invoking the image of a sinister radicalist instead of someone zealously passionate about something.

    To forcibly give an example shiddat or intiha pasandi say kise ko chahnaa i.e. to adore someone with extremist fervour. Due to the highly emotive quality of the urdu language it seems such twists are palatable.
     
  16. Sheikh_14 Senior Member

    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    Secondly if tashaddud pasand is one who likes to torment than what is a masachist who likes being on the receiving end. In this case perhaps we get the urdu equivalent of the english ravish dilemmna for which the same word can mean two opposing things.
     
  17. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Apparently, مساکیت masaakiyyat was coined but not commonly used as far as I know. But we can come up with others:

    مساکیت masaakiyyat = masochism = اذیت پسندی aZiyyat pasandii = آزارخواهی aazaar khwaahii

    مساکی masaakii = masochist = اذیت پسند aZiyyat pasand = آزارخواه aazaar khwaah, as opposed to زدہ اذیت aZiyyat zadah i.e. someone unwillinglysubjected to torment / torture.

    I like aazaar khwaahii as it is not ambiguous, unlike aZiyyat pasandii and for the same reason aazaar khaawh.

    Also aZiyyat khwaah, which seems better than aZiyyat pasand since the latter could also mean tormenter / torturer.
     
  18. Sheikh_14 Senior Member

    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    Wonderful, and the masaakiyaat is just a coinage with the english masochist as the root? Secondly is aazaar synonymous with aziyyat?
     
  19. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    'shiddat pasand' would be 'intensity-loving'.
     

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