1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

Urdu: چین ملک کے شمال پرحد باندھ تی ہے۔

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by teaboy, Dec 4, 2009.

  1. teaboy Senior Member

    USA
    English
    Is this a grammatically correct sentence and is the translation accurate?
    چین ملک کے شمال پرحد باندھ تی ہے۔

    China bounds/borders on the north of the country.
     
  2. omlick Senior Member

    Portland, Oregon, USA
    American English
    I think it is correct, except that baa.ndhtii should be baa.ndthaa باندھتا, as countries are treated as masculine entities۔

    (Names of geographical entities are treated as masculine except for rivers, bays, lakes and languages.)

    ٰ
     
  3. teaboy Senior Member

    USA
    English
    You may be right -- I put it in the feminine because حد is feminine...but I guess it should agree with چین, shouldn't it?
     
  4. omlick Senior Member

    Portland, Oregon, USA
    American English

    Yes, since China is the subject of the sentence.
     
  5. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi


    As Omlick has already pointed out the subject is a country (China) hence the verb has to be masculine.

    There is however another point I wish to make. Normally in Urdu we don't put the idea like this. It'll be more often as follows:

    چین ملك كے شمال پر واقع ہے

    OR

    چین ملك كی شمالی سرحد پر واقع ہے


    What you say is more like a literal translation.
     
  6. teaboy Senior Member

    USA
    English
    How would you translate واقع here? I've always used it only in the sense of Really?
     
  7. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    waaqe3 honaa واقِع ہونا= maujood honaa موجود ہونا = to be located / be placed / exist / be present somewhere.

    But,

    really = waaqe3ii واقعی = sach much سچ مُچ= = waaqe3an واقعاً ; also in some context: Haqiiqatan حقیقتاً.

    وہ مكان اُس پل كے پہلو \ بغل میں واقع ہے
    woh makaan us pul ke pahloo / baghal mei.n waaqe3 hai
    That house is located by the side of that bridge.
     
  8. omlick Senior Member

    Portland, Oregon, USA
    American English
    How would you write the word in devanagari? वाक़ or वाक़े?
     
  9. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    The latter of course - वाक़े. Although as you'll note, we really have no equivalent of either the letter 3ayn or the hamza - glottal stop in Hindi / Nagri script to convey the right sound at end of the final syllable here. It should always be pronounced as as 3ayn but often in casual speech it becomes more like a hamza sound.
     
  10. omlick Senior Member

    Portland, Oregon, USA
    American English

    ٰI still have trouble with the letter ayin. I guess I don't understand how it is treated.

    I don't follow the transliteration "3ayn" , does that just mean a generic ع or does it specifiy exactly at how it is pronounced in a word, especially at the end.

    Thanks
     
  11. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    Sorry it is difficult to follow your idea, what do you mean by a 'generic ع'?

    If it helps, ayn is the same wherever it is placed. At the end it makes the ending vowel sound more guttural e.g. as in alwidaa3 or tuluu3. I'd admit though that we very often reduce it to a glottal stop in fluid speech.
     
  12. omlick Senior Member

    Portland, Oregon, USA
    American English

    Yes, you answered the question for me. Thanks.
     

Share This Page