URDU: گاه

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by akhooha, Dec 17, 2013.

  1. akhooha Senior Member

    English - USA
    What does the word گاه mean?
    I have seen it used in the expression عید گاه where it is referring to a prayer ground outside the city especially for Eid.
    I have not been able to find the word گاه by itself in any online Urdu dictionaries.
    Could it possibly be an Urdu-ized adaptation of the Arabic word قاع ?
    Thank you.
    [h=1][/h]
     
  2. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    No, it is a Persian suffix used in Urdu as well, denoting a place.

    Exs. 3iid-gaah (ground for Eid prayers), sair-gaah (park), sharm-gaah (private part of human body) etc

    It also denotes time!

    saHar-gaah (dawn-time), gaah-ba-gaah (from time to time)
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2013
  3. akhooha Senior Member

    English - USA
    Thanks for your quick reply. So, it's a suffix --- no wonder I couldn't find it as a word. I'd been misled into thinking of it as a word, since it appears to be written independently, i.e. عید گاه and not عیدگاه.
    Thanks again for the information....
     
  4. Alfaaz Senior Member

    English
    Here is an entry from Urdu Lughat:
    Here is the entry in Platts:
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2013
  5. akhooha Senior Member

    English - USA
    Thanks for the detailed etymology. Now I'm certain that there's no connection with the Arabic قاع.
     
  6. fdb Senior Member

    Cambridge, UK
    French (France)
    Just to clarify: in Persian gāh in the sense “time” is a noun and can be used on its own, but in the sense “place” it is used only as the final element of a compound. They two homonyms are actually etymologically distinct:

    -gāh “place” < Old Persian gāϑu- “place, throne”

    gāh “time” < Avestan gāϑā- “hymn, one of the Gathas of Zarathustra, the time of the day for the recitation of one of the Gathas, time”.
     
  7. marrish

    marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    ^ This time really thanks for the etymology, it explains not only the usage in Persian but by extension in Urdu too.
     

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