Urdu: diacritics used in Lughat

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by Gope, Dec 16, 2013.

  1. Gope Senior Member

    Chennai
    Tamil
    Should be grateful for any member who would explain how diacritics over urdu in the Urdu Lughat are to be interpreted; in particular, the small zero over a letter, how the letter vav which stands for uu, au and v; and the ye which can stand for ii, ay etc. should be diferentiated. Perhaps there is a previous thread giving this information, grateful for a reference.
     
  2. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    It might be an idea if you gave us the full name of the dictionary and its compiler. Is it called "Urdu LuGhat"? The small zero on top of a consonant is a sukuun or jazm. It means there is no vowel after this consonant, e.g dar-zero-d (pain).
     
  3. Gope Senior Member

    Chennai
    Tamil
    Thanks once again, Qureshpor Saheb. The Lughat is what you can see at urduencyclopaedia.org.
    by the way, what is the Lughat alluded to sometimes in the forum?
     
  4. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    As explained above, the zero (sometimes open at the top!) means a sukuun, i.e. no vowel !
     
  5. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Not sure which luGhat you mean, if you indeed mean a particular one, but the word luGhat in Urdu means a dictionary.
     
  6. Gope Senior Member

    Chennai
    Tamil
    Sometimes open at the top? Like a crescent?
    and how are the pronunciations uu, v, o of vâv
    and the ii, e and y of the letter ye are distinguished?
    thanks.
     
  7. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    ^ janaab-i-3aalii, you will no doubt be aware that in Urdu script, the short vowels are omitted more often than not unless it is a children's book. One learns to recognise whole words and associates appropriate vowel quality to them. You would learn to read "myraa" as "meraa" and not "miiraa". Ghyr would be Ghair/Ghayr as in Ghair-Haazir (absent). myl could be mel (meeting), miil (one mile) or mail (dirt). kshvr as kishvar (or Kishore if you were his fan and the context implied it was he the writer was referring to. Besides his name would have kmaar followed by kshvr). For final e sound, there would be a "baRii ye" and for final -ii, there would be a chhoTii ye in place. So, my friend, it is a matter of practice I am afraid.
     
  8. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Yes Gope SaaHib! A crescent is the way to describe it as it often appears in print. As for the rest, please see QP SaaHib's reply (post#7).
     
  9. Gope Senior Member

    Chennai
    Tamil
    Many thanks. May I assure QP SaaHib I am following the advice implied in his reply: not a day without practice.
     

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