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Urdu: hamzulf

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by akak, May 28, 2010.

  1. akak Senior Member

    USA
    UK, India- English, Urdu, Hindi
    From what I remember, humzulf is used specifically to describe the relation between the husbands of two or more sisters... Is that right?
     
  2. Cilquiestsuens Senior Member

    French
    Yes, if you like your hamzulf are the husbands of your saalii / saaliyaa.n. I personaly have four of them, hence my proficiency with the concept :)
     
  3. akak Senior Member

    USA
    UK, India- English, Urdu, Hindi
    That must be a lot of fun. ;)
     
  4. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Do people use <hamzulf> as much as <birādar e niSbatī>? Do you hear (or personally use) <sālā> ever?

    We discussed this here earlier.
     
  5. akak Senior Member

    USA
    UK, India- English, Urdu, Hindi
    I had never heard birādar e niSbatī before, that's why I was a bit confused. Sala is very common.
     
  6. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Would you use <sālā> more than the other two?
     
  7. akak Senior Member

    USA
    UK, India- English, Urdu, Hindi
    Sala would be used only for wife's brothers and humzulf for wife's sisters' husbands. Some people may say saali ka shauhar instead of humzulf. I can't remember ever hearing birādar e niSbatī.
     
  8. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi

    As others have confirmed, yes! .... and I hear only hamzulf all the time!

    baraadar-e-nisbatii = wife's brother or sister's husband!
     
  9. Cilquiestsuens Senior Member

    French
    So that is either hamzulf or behnoii (don't you say jiijaa in Hindi ?)

    This sounds to me like a translation of brother-in-law... Do they use the term in Persian ????

    What is striking with Urdu / Hindi kinship terms is that they are very precise and describe normally only one specific relation... (contrary to the English terms especially the very vague ones using -in-law)
     
  10. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Quite! It could be either ھمزلف hamzulf / بہنوئی banho2ii !!

    Although
    hamzulf consists of two Persian words (ham + zulf ), it is not used in Farsi. Brother-in-law in Persian can be either of these: برادر زن \ برادر شوهر\ شوهر خواهر\ باجناق \ هم داماد
    Oh yes! I had a discussion about this with an Englishman and he was surprised as to how precise we are!
     
  11. akak Senior Member

    USA
    UK, India- English, Urdu, Hindi
    So are we saying that baraader e nisbatii covers all a man's brothers-in-law, of which saala, behnoi and humzulf are specific subsets?
     
  12. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Yep, <jījā> is what we say. People also say <jījū> too; I think this is the more affectionate term.
     
  13. linguist786 Senior Member

    Blackburn, England
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    LOL that's a vulgar word for breasts in Gujarati :D

    This is the first time I've heard this term "hamzulf". In Gujarati we say "banevi" for sister's husband, "haaro" for wife's brother and "haaru bhai" for wife's sister's husband.

    In Urdu, "behno2ii" is exclusively for sister's husband, right?
     
  14. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Funnily enough something similar is true in Urdu. Although some do use jiijaa ( جیجا = sister’s husband) but avoid jiijii (جیجی), as it can mean teat / nipple! However, others do use jiijii to mean sister = diidii !!
     
  15. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Can someone spell the word سانڈھو correctly for me here? I think this is yet another synonym for ھمزلف.

    So just to confirm, my sister's husband (jeeja in my household) is also my hamzulf, sandhu, and bahnoi?
     
  16. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Sorry! But I never heard of saanDhu for hamzulf!

    Actually it sounds rather rude because we call a stud (stallion / bull etc. for breeding) سانڈ saanD! :D
     
  17. Cilquiestsuens Senior Member

    French
    It actually is a Punjabi word... and as Fayla sb nicely pointed out, not an Urdu one....
     
  18. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    This appears to be an indigenous word. Pashto uses saanD.huu as well as Punjabi, and Sindhi slightly morphs it to (if my memory's to be relied) saaRuu. My motley Pakistani acquaintances actually jeered at Urduwaale using a word as posh as hamzulf for something as simple as saanDhuu.
     
  19. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Language valuations are so perplexing! So, the word hamzulf theoretically exists for some Urduphones, but it's too good for a mere brother-in law. I'd say, by the way, that hamzulf is also an indigenous word.

    Ahhh! Good to know. The Punjabi I know is <bahnoiya>. I think you told me that word a while back too - it's funny how I conveniently imbibed it as knowledge time immemorial.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2010
  20. Cilquiestsuens Senior Member

    French
    I hope there is no confusion here, I may not have been clear enough...

    I meant to say saa.nDhuu is a Punjabi word, hamzulf is Urdu of course...
     
  21. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Here is a connected word.

    H ساڙهو साढ़ूsāṛhū [S. श्याली+वोढा], s.m. A wife's sister's husband.
     
  22. greatbear Senior Member

    India
    India - Hindi & English
    In Hindi, it is saaND(h)uu, never saanDhuu, for a wife's sister's husband. It is also very commonly used in Gujarati.
     
  23. UrduMedium Senior Member

    United States
    Urdu (Karachi)
    Yes saaRhuu is a standard and popular informal word for hamzulf in Urdu.
     
  24. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    Also very popular, but not so popular as hamzulf, is saaNDuu. It would be the same as gb wrote.
     
  25. Sheikh_14 Senior Member

    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    As you have stated the two words are both derived from farsi its difficult to deduce why hum zulf that seems to be suggesting a likeness in hair in literal terms, has anything to do with one being an in law?
    In fact had it not been for its common usage the former would have made far more sense. Could someone kindly amplify the background as to why this happens to be the case.
     

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