Urdu, Hindi: Appointment

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by Qureshpor, Jul 10, 2011.

  1. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    How would you translate, "appointment" as in a Doctor's/Dentist's appointment?
     
  2. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    rendez-vous?
    liqaa2
    ?

    A word that everyone understands might be mu3aiiyanah mulaaqaat.
     
  3. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    We do have in Urdu mau3id to mean just that - appointment -but few would use it. Almost everybody in Indo-Pak says ‘appointment’ or ‘meeting’, depending.

    Only those wishing to speak proper Urdu may resort to what BP SaHeb said (mu3aiiyanah mulaaqaat) or go for mau3id and then take the trouble to explain that the terms mean an appointment!


     
  4. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    I think "mau3id" is fine for a one to one translation. But, for "I have made an appointment to see my doctor", one could simply say, "maiN ne apne Doctor se milne ke liyevaqt le liyaa hai.
     
  5. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi

    Yes, or its variations. These are also used:

    maiN ne apne Tabiib / Doctor / daakTar se waqt le liyaa hai
    Even this:
    maiN ne apne Tabiib / Doctor / daakTar se waqt liyaa hai

    I've made an appointment wit my dcotor.
     
  6. marrish

    marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    What would be other ways to express this idea? Eg. "Please make an appointment before consultation"?
     
  7. UrduMedium Senior Member

    United States
    Urdu (Karachi)
    Going the translation way and starting with "to appoint" we get taqarrur karnaa. From here the using Arabic forms one can get the following:

    taqarrur - process of appointment
    mutaqarrir - one who appoints
    mutaqarrar - appointment

    Now mutaqarrar is quite a mouthful and not quite what the OP may have imagined ... :)
     
  8. Alfaaz Senior Member

    English
    This is really nice with all the rrr...! What would be the one who is appointed?

    There is also : آپ کل مقررہ وقت / وقت مقرر/طے شدہ / فیصل شدہ/ مخصوص وقت پر پہنچ جایئیگا

    Edit: Just saw this:
    برائے مہربانی وقت مقرر/ طے/ فیصل/ مخصوص کروا لیں قبل از مشاورت
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2012
  9. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    But is n't this a different kind of appointment, UM SaaHib?
     
  10. Alfaaz Senior Member

    English
    So are you suggesting it can only be used in the sense of "appointment letter" , etc. ?
     
  11. UrduMedium Senior Member

    United States
    Urdu (Karachi)
    Good question. Perhaps. I don't really know. Except that I feel the two "appointments" are semantically connected, despite their seemingly different usages. Both mean to designate or affix (someone or something). In one case it is a person to a position, and in another it may be a person to a time. So I feel they are at least "related".

    Kind of like the two meanings of Urdu word ittefaaq: agreement, and coincidence. An agreement is really a coincidence of two opinions in a communication, much like ittefaq meaning chance is a coindidence of events in time.
     
  12. greatbear Senior Member

    India
    India - Hindi & English
    'waqt lenaa' or 'samay lenaa'.
     
  13. marrish

    marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    Would the following suggestions also work, in addition to the proper and much used ways of saying it? I'm inspired by the input of Alfaaz and UM SaaHibaan:


    (tibbii mu3aa'ine se pahlle)... vaqt-e mulaaqaat mu3ayyan karaa'eN ... muqarrar karaa'eN/kareN ...
     
  14. bakshink Senior Member

    China
    punjabi
  15. Alfaaz Senior Member

    English
    I would guess so; aap waqt-e-mulaqaat par naheen tashreef laaye haiN, is liye ab aapko Tabeeb ki fee ke saath saath late fee bhi dena hogi!
    GT gives another interesting one (under Persian): وعدہ ملاقات
     
  16. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو

    Would n't this mean "one who is appointed"? "taqarrur" (an appointment) would be the verbal noun.
     
  17. Sheikh_14 Senior Member

    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    Could you kindly type the given word muaid for appointment in urdu script for proper tallafus. Despite its very low usage is this a direct synonym for an appointment in the form of a meeting.
     
  18. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    mau3id مَوعِد

     
  19. marrish

    marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    Off topic remark: you seem to have been a great typesetter in Urdu's own script now!
     
  20. Sheikh_14 Senior Member

    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    Precisely which brings me to a question which has very little relevance to this one besides the rujhan (trend) seen here, that being that since the noun ending in -ar refers to the one affected and ir to the affecter why isn't it forwarded to the pattern used for accusations. For instance Ilzam being the word being used to wrought others the accused rather than the accuser is referred to as the Mulzim.

    My primary questions here being is there any logic behind that and what would the accuser than be called besides the cumbersome ilzam deyne wala.
     
  21. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    ^ Good question...

    The accused should be "mulzam" and the accuser"mulzi​m".
     
  22. Sheikh_14 Senior Member

    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    Precisely, and so begins our quest to bring the errant to the Rah e adabi rast !!:) I had a feeling something was fishy so is it a case of common misusage?
     
  23. Sheikh_14 Senior Member

    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    Why wouldn't mau3id rakhna suffice, if it does literally equate to an appointment?
     
  24. littlepond Senior Member

    Hindi
    That's interesting to know, as in Hindi films, including those written by Urdu writers as well, I have always heard "mulzim" for the accused.
     
  25. Sheikh_14 Senior Member

    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    "I think "mau3id" is fine for a one to one translation. But, for "I have made an appointment to see my doctor", one could simply say, "maiN ne apne Doctor se milne ke liyevaqt le liyaa hai."- QP


    Granted that the alternative you have given is easy on the common man's eyes and ears but isn't the option given by Faylasoof more precise and less verbose? I.e. Main ne apne Tabiib/Doctor se Mau3id rakh/le liye hai.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2014

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