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Urdu-Hindi-Persian: takyah-i-kalaam تکیہء کلام

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by Qureshpor, Dec 14, 2011.

  1. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Sometimes individuals have a favourite word or phrase which they use regularly in their conversations, probably being utterly unaware of the frequency of their usage. In the Persian forum, searcher 123 (aaqaa-ye-Morteza), for example, uses the word "albeit" like clockwork! In Urdu we use the phrase "takyah-i-kalaam" ( تکیہء کلام ) for this phenomenon. What do Hindi and Persian users employ for this?
     
  2. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    In Persian we do have تكيه كلام = a habitual phrase or word! In fact we got it from Farsi.

    As dehkhoda mentions:

    کلمه ای که در تکلم داخل کنند بدون آنکه دارای معنی باشد
     
  3. greatbear Senior Member

    India
    India - Hindi & English
    In Hindi as well we use "takyah-i-kalaam", but most Hindi speakers pronounce it as "takyah-kalaam". However, most of us (including me) are unaware of the meanings of "takyah" and "kalaam".
     
  4. searcher123

    searcher123 Senior Member

    My home ;-) /The Persian Gulf
    Farsi/Persian/فارسي
    In Modern Persian we use تكّيه كلام (Tekkyeh Kalaam) or تكيه كلام (Tekyeh Kalaam) too, albeit :) my albeit is not a real تكيه كلام, because it is used with meaning :cool:
     
  5. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو

    greatbear, as for the first one, you rest your head on it whilst sleeping (pillow) but in this context, it means "support", "prop" or "reliance". "kalaam" is simply "speech".
     
  6. greatbear Senior Member

    India
    India - Hindi & English
    Thanks; didn't know it was the same takyah that I use for pillow!
     
  7. flyinfishjoe Senior Member

    American English
    In Hindi, I usually see it spelled तकिया-कलाम takiyaa-kalaam without an izafa.
     
  8. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    This is exactly how we would write it in Hindi because Hindi doesn't have the izaafah system, unlike Urdu and Farsi. Having said this, the more common way to say (and write) in Urdu is also without the izaafah! So you'll hear takyah-kalaam much more than takya-e-kalaam even by Urduphones, including those who have had a good grounding in Persian!
     

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