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Urdu: mukarrami

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by panjabigator, Nov 27, 2008.

  1. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    I just looked this word up and encountered "respected sir." Could this be used to address someone in a formal letter? Is it like <mohtarm> (sic)?

    And is there a mo'annis to this?
     
  2. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    You're absolutely spot on. It IS written in letters.

    The moannath could be <mukarrama[h]>. I'm not sure though because we say Makkah mukarramah, now is Makkah feminine in Arabic? Or 'city' itself?
    If you follow the rules, the mukarrama should be it.

    PS: Looks like you just read my first post in your Sindhi thread!
     
  3. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Thank you. I will let you know if I have some more queries on its usage - I'm bound to have them.

    PS: Read it and will reply:)
     
  4. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Yes, Makkah (مَكّہ) is grammatically feminine as is Madina = Madeenah (مَدیِنَہ) . Hence the feminine mukarramah (مُكَرّمہ) for the former and munawwarah (مُنَوّرة) for the latter. The feminine of muhtaram (مُحتَرَم) is indeed muhtaramah (مُحتَرَمَہ) and that of mukarram (مُكَرَّم) is mukarramah (مُكَرّمہ).
     
  5. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    gator miaN, please note that mukarrami is somewhat of an abridgment of say <Saahib-e-mukarram><-notice how the latter expression looks unbalanced and if you don't mind my saying, retarded. E.g. mukarrami gator sahab, mujhe mukarrami Philosophe nay aap say musharraf ba mulaaqaat honay ki hidaayat ki Thi.

    The suffix i (or ee if you like) is added to adjectves(?) to form words used to address people, usually in direct speech.
     
  6. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Mukarrami BP aur gator Saahibaan, I would use 'mukarram' either as 'mukarrami (fulaaN) ' or as 'janaab mukarram (fulaaN) saahab'. The former (mukarrami / mukarramee) is an Arabic construct = my respected. The -i / -ee at the end = my, and so in Arabic and is different from the Farsi 'izaafat' which you correctly show in your example: 'saahab-e-mukarram'. BTW, Mukarram is also a boy's name,e.g. Mukarram Jaah, son / grandson of the last recognised Nizam of Hyderabad. Faqat mukhlis, Faylasoof
     

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