Urdu: phakii?

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by UrduMedium, Jun 21, 2013.

  1. UrduMedium Senior Member

    United States
    Urdu (Karachi)
    Noticed this word at the end of the headline in the attached news report. Anyone knows what this word means? I could not find it in my dictionary.

    Edit: Sorry cannot upload the image. Keeps giving error. The headline from newspaper read as follows:

    وفاقی وزیر ریلوے کا راولپنڈی تک سفر، قومی خزانے کو ۱۰ لاکھ کی پھکی

    نواے وقت ۲۱ جون

    Edit: Link to report here.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2013
  2. marrish

    marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    Please do attach the news report and if possible provide the headline!
     
  3. UrduMedium Senior Member

    United States
    Urdu (Karachi)
    ^ Please check the updates above.
     
  4. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    UM SaaHib, having had a quick glance (no time to read the news item now), I think it is phikii - from pheknaa. here to throw away / cause to waste / cause a loss.

    Federal Railway Minister's trip to (till) Rawalpindi - loss of 10 lakh (Rupees) to the National Exchequer.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2013
  5. marrish

    marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    Thank you. The word is not phakii but phakkii پھکّی. It means a handful of some dry powdery substance like fennel seeds or ajwain seeds or some medicine that should be consumed dry (which is of course not necessarily easy or pleasant). In this context it means to tear something to dry pieces in the sense of wasting.
     
  6. Alfaaz Senior Member

    English
    Here is a dictionary entry. In addition to the above mentioned examples, it seems to be used in the forms پھکنا ، پکھتا/پھکتی ، پھکّو ...perhaps a different pronunciation of پھانکنا?!
     
  7. marrish

    marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    Yes, it is related to the last verb you mention!
     
  8. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    As far as Urdu is concerned, this is how a couple of well known dictionaries define this word:
    phaknii/phaNknii/phaNkii = phaaNkne kii davaa (Verbs: phaknaa/phaaNknaa)

    The Punjabi equivalent is "phakkii" as has already been mentioned by marrish SaaHib.

    I have n't come across this usage before but I suspect the meaning is equivalent to "haRap kar jaanaa" or "nuqsaan pahuNchaanaa". Faylasoof SaaHib has already provided the latter meaning albeit via a different route. Here are a few more examples from the net.

    aaj vifaaqii daaru_lHukuumat aur Karachi meN hone vaale sarkaarii jalsoN se qaumii xazaane ko ek arab ki phakkii lage gii. (..kaa nuqsaan ho gaa)

    Shayaan Centre meN chorii kii vaardaat: naa-ma3luum chor dukkaandaar ko taqriib-an ek laakh kii phakkii de ga’e...(kaa nuqsaan..)

    Hukuumatii xazaanah ko karoRoN kii phakii (..kaa nuqsaan)

     
  9. UrduMedium Senior Member

    United States
    Urdu (Karachi)
    Thanks everyone for your responses. Seems like phakkii (Punjabi) is intended word here. Others don't quite seem to fit well. Interesting word ...
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2013
  10. marrish

    marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    QP SaaHib said it was Punjabi form of the word and it is certainly true but the whole picture can be seen in janaab-e-Platts' definition which attests the word being a part of Urdu vocabulary more than a century ago:

    H پهکي फक्की phakkī, = H پهکيا फकिया phakiyā, s.f.=phaṅkī; phāṅkī, qq.v.

    The link to the online Urdu lexicon for phaaNknaa points out to this meaning:
    3. { مجازا } روپیہ اٹھانا، نہایت خرچ کرنا، دولت اڑانا۔ (فرہنگِ آصفیہ)
    majaaz-an} rupiyyah uThaanaa, nihaayat xarch karnaa, daulat uRaanaa} - (Farhang-e-Aasafiyyah).

    In this way we can see that there is a connection on the grounds of Urdu of the idiom phaaNknaa and phakkii karnaa/maarnaa/uRaanaa. Still I follow QP SaaHib and I would say that particular idiom ''phakkii lagnaa'' and the similar has Punjabi background.

    As generally known, journalese frequently uses expressions and idioms one would not have used when composing a neat and clean text.​
     
  11. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    ^ Shah SaaHib, I did point out Urdu words too but I must confess I somehow missed the metaphorical meaning provided in the Farhang. In conclusion, one can say that phakkii (I don't think Farhang-i-Asifiyyag and Nur-ul-Lughaat gives the pronunciation as "phakkii") is used with its original Urdu nuance but in Punjabi style!
     
  12. marrish

    marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    I'd agree on the whole with your conclusion, with one reservation which is phakkii being inculded in Platts. Of course it is only a regional variant which coincides with Punjabi and the other more current words have a nasal ''n''.
     
  13. Alfaaz Senior Member

    English
    As always, corrections to any misconceptions would be appreciated, but this seemed like another (slang?) equivalent of چونا لگنا، ہاتھ/ہینڈ ہونا، وغیرہ ...!?
     
  14. marrish

    marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    Not that I know as those given by you Alfaaz SaaHib, are about deceipt, treachery and so on, not about a loss.
     
  15. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Everyone has made interesting points on this! To really ascertain what word is this may require contacting the paper directly! However, according to my perspective and understanding and prior experience this is phikii from pheknaa / pheNknaa and not from phaaNknaa.

    By phaaNknaa, we always mean to toss or chuck something in the mouth, e.g. phal kii phaaNK phaaNknaa or chuuran / tambaakuu (تنباکو तंबाकू) phaaNknaa. From this verb we also have: phaNkii = phaaNkne kii dawaa, and phaaNK = A flake, or a piece / slice of any edible thing (usually fruit) that can be tossed in the mouth. [Platts : H پهانك फांक phāṅk [S. प्रक्षिप्त; or प्राश+क], s.m. As much of anything as can be thrown or taken into the mouth; bit, piece, slice (of fruit), flake; a clove (of garlic)]

    This use of phikii / phikaa is not unusual for us and I can demonstrate how we use it:

    dukaan kii be-Hadd qiimat lagii / uThii magar sab phikii!

    The shop was valued much / sold for a large sum but all was lost / wasted!

    bahut qiimatii maal thaa magar sab phikaa!

    The goods were very valuable but all lost!

    In the news item above, my understanding of 10 laakh ki phikii can be seen as 10 laakh kii raqam phikii with the word raqam in the original being محذوف maHZuuf . This makes sense to me.

    Now if this is meant to be something else, like phakkii, then I'm not aware of it as we don't use it.
     
  16. UrduMedium Senior Member

    United States
    Urdu (Karachi)
    ^ Faylasoof saahab- But the "ko" in the sentence does not seem to go with your explanation of phikii, at least to my ears. What do you say?

    قومی خزانے کو ۱۰ لاکھ کی (رقم) پھکی
     
  17. Chhaatr Senior Member

    Hindi
    Is this "phakkii" = Hindi "chapat lagnaa", "chuunaa lagnaa"?
     
  18. UrduMedium Senior Member

    United States
    Urdu (Karachi)
    ^ I tend to agree with chapat lagnaa as the meaning of this word. As in, "chaalaan se 500 rupai ki chapat lag gaii" meaning unexpected loss.
     
  19. Chhaatr Senior Member

    Hindi
    Thank you for the clarification. chapat lagnaa and chuunaa lagnaa are basically the same.
     
  20. UrduMedium Senior Member

    United States
    Urdu (Karachi)
    ^ You are probably right. However, I'm not used to hearing chuunaa lagnaa with monetary or material loss, but only cheating.
     
  21. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    UM SaaHib, I was debating about that ! The use of kii instead would be more common but I have heard the ko form as well. However, looking at the alternative of phakkii = chapat can also fit and perhaps that was really meant. We don't use phakkii, but چپت chapat / ٹیپ Tiip, yes definitely!
     
  22. marrish

    marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    In agreement with post 14 of mine.
     

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