Urdu: Qaabuli or Kaabuli pullao

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by lcfatima, Jun 27, 2009.

  1. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    The dish is Afghan in origin, it is basically a type of yakhni pullao in some recipes and more like a biriani in other recipes, with some variation on additional ingredients depending on which region/country it is being prepared (seems it is as far away from Afghanistan as India, and Gulf Arabs make it, too). In my husband's family it contains alu bukhaaray and channa daal as its distinction, and the rice is cooked separately from the gravy, qualifying it as a biriani---the channa daal make it seem Afghan. I have seen Afghan recipes for this with carrots and raisins. In English orthography there is both Qabuli and Kabuli. I used to think it was Kaabuli after the city. Then someone told me it is Qaabuli of the root q/b/l cognate of maqbool, meaning like a welcoming daawat type pullao, and that I had been mispronouncing it without the qaaf. How is it written in Urdu? Or maybe these are two different pullaos? Any insight?
     
  2. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    I would still say it is kaabulii-کابلی- pulaao, named after the city. Maybe the person confused it with Qubuuli-قبولی-, which is nothing but k-hichRii with daal e chanaa. Btw, the word relates to maqbuul.

    When I first had kaabulii pulao, they said the distinction was that it had raisins. But that's hardly it, since I always put either raisins or aluu bukhaare in whenever I make any kind of biryaanii.

    PS: I just stumbled upon this, maybe it could be help to you as well.
     
  3. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    I agree with BP, it is kaabulii کابلی (= kabuli from Kabul). This.
    In a similar vein we have kaabulii chanaa. Here. For many of us, chhole or better still kaabulii chhole كابلی چھولے!
     
  4. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    So there is a dish such as this? Then there are two different dishes. Upon googling there seems to be widespread confusion as to whether it is Kaabuli or Qabuli in Indian recipes, and some recipes offer both names.


    My in-law's recipe for Qabooli pullao contains mainly chicken, channa daal, and alu bukharay. It is their special "eid dish." They are "Gangetic Pathans" by ethnicity and according to my mother in law her recipe is very old.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2009
  5. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    I looked in an English language Afghan cook book and the author does not include a Kabuli pullao but gives two recipes for "Qabili pullao." I am beginning to think that Kabuli is an Indianization.
     
  6. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    The "qubuulii" I'm used to is characterised by chane ki daal/chick peas. If someone adds chicken then that would not have altered this primary characteristic!

    Could you post us a picture of that cook book. I'm burning with curiosity.
     
  7. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    Channa daal (not chick peas) is what characterizes this pullao for desis from what I gather from googling.

    In the book Afghan Food and Cookery by Helen Saberi, neither of her two Qabuli pullao recipes contain any lentil. Saberi's transliterations of Dari words fairly consistent, which is why I suspect it is "qabuli." Also in Tess Mallos' The Complete Middle East cook, the recipe for "Khabli Palau" as it is labeled in the Afghanistan section lacks any lentil. All three recipes have nuts, raisins, and carrots in a garam masala laden yakhni pullao type pilaf.

    Also, I googled Qabuli Palau and got loads of Afghan rather than Indian recipes. Kabuli pullao is nearly all Indian recipes.

    I want to know how this is written in Dari. Kaaf or qaaf? Or are there two dishes, one of Kabul and one which is qabuli? Then we would know for sure.

    By the way, how is "qubooli" accurately translated into English?
     
  8. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    BP, I'm sure it is Qabuli / Qaabulii and not "quboolii / qubuulii".

    It might help to know the geography of the country we are discussing! In Afghanistan there is Kabul / Kabol, the capital located in Velayat-e Kabol (Province of Kabol):


    ....and there is Qabul, in Velayat-e Kandahar / Qandahar :


    Same or different dishes may emanate from either of these places, hence the confusion in names.

    There is a Qabul even in Sind, Pakistan, but that is unlikely as these dishes are originally of Afgahan / Iran origin.

    I think the presence or absence of lentils is not the reason for their names, it is their origin, Kabul or Qabul.

    This site gives you the recipe in the original language!
     
  9. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    Thanks big F for the clarification of the place-names.

    The site you cited says to put 'one daana' chicken in, I was thinking more along the lines of lamb which they have in abundance in Afghanistan...
     
  10. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    Afghan food is very regional just like every other place's food so I am sure there are various original and authentic recipes. Thanks for the clarification, Faylasoof.
     
  11. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    If Qabuli is taken as an adjective and not the place name in Qandahar, what does it mean exactly?
     
  12. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    I forgot to update on this but I found out in Dari it is qaabili pulao قابلی پلو and not named for Kabul, although apparently there is Kabuli style qaabili pilao as well as several other styles.
     

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