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Vacances rime avec détente.

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by vegangirl, Mar 4, 2008.

  1. vegangirl Senior Member

    France french
    J'ai traduit cette phrase en anglais. Pouvez-vous corriger les fautes s'il vous plaît ?

    phrase : Vacances rime avec détente.
    traduction : When you are on holiday, you relax.

    Quand on part en vacances, on se détend. On est détendu. On est tranquille. Il n'y a pas de stress. On est loin du stress du travail et de toute l'agitation de la ville.
     
  2. Franglais1969

    Franglais1969 Senior Member

    Angleterre.
    English English, français rouillé
    To keep the little rhyme, as well as the sense, why not:

    Holiday rhymes with relaxing stay.
     
  3. chapteryx

    chapteryx Senior Member

    Holidays and relaxation go hand-in-hand .. ?
     
  4. Franglais1969

    Franglais1969 Senior Member

    Angleterre.
    English English, français rouillé
    But you lose the rhyme element of the translation then...
     
  5. marquis Junior Member

    Canada; English
    Vacation rhymes with relaxation.
     
  6. Franglais1969

    Franglais1969 Senior Member

    Angleterre.
    English English, français rouillé
    Strictly AE. If you are seeking a BE expression, vacation is not used here.
     
  7. marquis Junior Member

    Canada; English
    CE actually.
     
  8. Franglais1969

    Franglais1969 Senior Member

    Angleterre.
    English English, français rouillé
    Well I have never heard of CE. We tend to use AE and BE. Vacation is most definitely AE, (unless you are claiming it is only Canadians which use it, which I know isn't true).
     
  9. marquis Junior Member

    Canada; English
    Altogether too much emphasis on BE and AE. What of Australia, New Zealand, and so on? In Canada, we have the best of all worlds. Flexibility is fun; stuffiness is not! :)
     
  10. Franglais1969

    Franglais1969 Senior Member

    Angleterre.
    English English, français rouillé
    Australia and New Zealand, as well as Eire, typically follow BE. I did not make up these acronyms, they are extremely common in linguistic terms. It is important to know what type of audience the English is aimed at. There is an incredible amount of difference between AE and BE, where even the the most basic words have completely different meanings in the two languages.

    I am sorry that you mistake precision for stuffiness.
     
  11. vegangirl Senior Member

    France french
    Merci de m'avoir aidée.
     

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