1. LouisaB Senior Member

    English, UK
    Hi, everyone,

    I always believed that 'Vaya con Dios' meant 'Go with God' and was a nice thing to say on parting, but I see from the net that it can now be used as a form of swearing, which is quite offensive.

    Is that in fact true?
    Would I be safe to use it in the 'nice' sense for a fictional character to say in the 17th century?

    Many thanks for your help,

    Louisa
     
  2. alexacohen

    alexacohen Senior Member

    Santiago de Compostela
    Spanish. Spain
    Hi Louisa,
    It's a nice thing to say but it is not used any longer in Spain, I don't know about the rest of the countries. I have never herad of it as a form of swearing!
    Alexa
     
  3. Soy Yo Senior Member

    USA
    EEUU - inglés
    It does mean "Go with God" similar to "Goodbye" que se deriva de "God be with you" ---> Godbewiye etc.
     
  4. DCPaco Senior Member

    Planet Earth
    Spanish of Mexico/ English of the USA
    Hmmm...well, I've never heard of it being used profanely...I've heard "vete al diablo." Although, the expression is certainly archaic...I've never heard a true native speaker use it.

    Vaya con Dios my Darling

    Now the hacienda's dark
    The town is sleeping
    Now the time has come to part
    The time for weeping

    Vaya con Dios, my darling
    Vaya con Dios, my love

    Now the village mission bells are softly ringing
    If you listen with your heart
    You'll hear them singing

    Vaya con Dios, my darling
    Vaya con Dios, my love

    Wherever you may be, I'll be beside you
    Although you're many million dreams away
    Each night I'll say a pray'r
    A pray'r to guide you
    To hasten every lonely hour
    Of every lonely day
    Now the dawn is breaking through a gray tomorrow
    But the memories we share are there to borrow

    Vaya con Dios, my darling
    Vaya con Dios, my love

    [Musical Interlude]

    Vaya con Dios, my darling
    Vaya con Dios, my love
     
  5. Aquical

    Aquical Senior Member

    Washington
    México Spanish
    In México is rarely used, but I've heard it in movies, and it means "may God be with you", but never as a form of swearing.
     
  6. LouisaB Senior Member

    English, UK
    Thank you all very much for your most helpful answers.

    The 'swearing' notion may be completely wrong. I found it in a discussion thread when doing a general search on the phrase 'Viya con dios'. I'm afraid I don't seem to be able to post the link, but here is what the Latin American speaker said:

    Either way, it sounds as if I should be quite safe to use the phrase in a novela histórica set in the 17th century. From my point of view, 'archaic' is good!

    Thank you all again.

    Louisa
     
  7. DCPaco Senior Member

    Planet Earth
    Spanish of Mexico/ English of the USA
    Well, in that context, I can see what s/he means...it's like a death threat. I mean if you are being told "Go with God" it might mean: I hope you die!...but, that might be stretching it a bit.
     
  8. lforestier

    lforestier Moderator

    San Antonio, TX USA
    Puerto Rico - Spanish/English
    It might be like saying "I hope you wake up with the angels" which might sound nice but means "I wish you were dead". I've heard "vaya con Dios" said as a parting remark by our local priest but it's not used in normal coversation anymore.
     

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