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Vegetables Names.

Discussion in 'English Only' started by AbouAbdallah, Oct 11, 2005.

  1. AbouAbdallah New Member

    Saudi Arabia - Arabic
    Hi Friends, I am an english student.
    Can I have a list of Vegetables names and a list of Fruits names and a list of Foods names.

    Thank you very much.
     
  2. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Hello AbouAbdallah, and welcome to the WR Forums.

    These forums are for people to ask and answer questions about the use of language. We would not provide lists such as you have requested.

    I have taken a look around the Internet and I found a site that lists many foods, fruits and vegetables CLICK HERE. You will need to scroll down the page to see the lists.

    If you have questions about English, we will try to help:)
    Panj
     
  3. AbouAbdallah New Member

    Saudi Arabia - Arabic
    Thank you,Panj.
     
  4. Jean Pierre New Member

    Santiago
    Spanish Chile
    Cant find a vegetable that starts with n
     
  5. maxiogee Senior Member

    imithe
    Nettles
     
  6. Kräuter_Fee

    Kräuter_Fee Senior Member

    Spain
    Portuguese&Spanish (native)/ (English&German - foreign)
  7. Jean Pierre New Member

    Santiago
    Spanish Chile
    Thank you very much to both of you
     
  8. maxiogee Senior Member

    imithe

    Irish Nettle Soup
    .5 litre water or milk and water or (meat or vegetable) stock
    30 g butter
    30 g rolled oats
    .25 litre chopped young nettles
    pepper, salt
    1 good teaspoon chopped parsley

    Bring the liquid and the butter to boiling point, then stir in the oats. When the pan returns to the boil, add the nettles and seasoning. Cover and simmer for 30 to 45 minutes, stirring occasionally. Taste and correct the seasoning, add the parsley and leave for another two minutes. Then serve.
     
  9. foxfirebrand

    foxfirebrand Senior Member

    The Northern Rockies
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Don't resort to eating weeds-- neaps are real vegetables.
    .
     
  10. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Neeps, double-e, are turnips (or swedes for those outside the neep-zone).
    Alternatively, they are parsnips.

    Nasturtiums - flower and leaf.
    Nori - OK it's seaweed, but still vegetable.
     
  11. A90Six Senior Member

    London
    England - English.
    New potatoes?:D


    The flower name always makes me think of Hilda Baker, who would berate people for casting nasturtiums.
     
  12. foxfirebrand

    foxfirebrand Senior Member

    The Northern Rockies
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    I thought of nori too, and decided not to go there.

    Neaps (preferred spelling in the one source I found that even mentioned the damn things) are neither turnips nor parsnips, regardless of the etymology.

    Third time's a charm, though-- they are indeed "Swedes," more commonly known as rutabagas. Denser than turnips, yellow-fleshed rather than white, and prone to exude a waxy coating when stored in a root cellar. I can hardly wait for fall. Parsnips are of course like nothing else, and are a variety of parsley.

    Hate to sound so categorical, so I'll say something more clearly opinionated about nasturtiums-- to me they belong in a category with that other potherb mentioned by that other Irishman, namely weeds. If you want something even nastier, try "edible" chrysanthemum leaves.
    .
     
  13. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Ah, well, as I said, neeps are turnips inside the traditional neep-zone.
    Turnips are those things you describe, and call swedes.
    TURNIP

    Swedes are a pale imitation of a turnip, with white watery flesh and thin skin.
    SWEDE
    or alternatively,
    SWEDE
    and here are some naked
    SWEDES.

    I sincerely hope no one tracks the sites I have accidentally come across in this search for truth.

    I wouldn't wish to create an international vegetable-names war, of course - HERE is one example of the debate on this fascinating topic. There are variations in the terminology across the UK as well as internationally.
     
  14. maxiogee Senior Member

    imithe
    Neeps are only an 'n' word in some dialects!
    (And neaps are tides) ;)

    Weeds are but plants growing in a place you'd prefer they didn't!
    I won't hear a word against nettles from those who have not tried them!
     

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