1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

verbündete

Discussion in 'Deutsch (German)' started by Dupon, Jan 3, 2014.

  1. Dupon Senior Member

    Chinese
    1st example:
    Zu den Angriffen bekannte sich die mit dem Terrornetzwerk Al-Kaida verbündete radikal-islamische Shabaab-Miliz.

    In "die mit dem Terrornetzwerk Al-Kaida verbündete radikal-islamische Shabaab-Miliz", I thought the prepositional phrase could be changed into the passive mode:
    Zu den Angriffen bekannte sich die radikal-islamische Shabaab-Miliz, die mit dem Terrornetzwerk Al-Kaida verbündet ist(wird??).

    But I also found 2nd example:
    das vor drei Tagen aus meiner Schublade verschwundene Dossier.(das Dossier, das vor drei Tagen aus meiner Schublade verschwunden ist).
    Here although it is also a past participle, but I think this can not be a passive mode. This is a perfect tense.

    So my question is in such participle phrase which is a common structure in German, when it is a past participle, there might be two situations: Passive mode and perfect tense. In this way, could I understand the 1st example as "..., die mit dem Terrornetzwerk Al-Kaida verbündet hat"? This seems to be also correct in grammar.

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2014
  2. Schimmelreiter

    Schimmelreiter Senior Member

    Deutsch
    It means die mit dem Terrornetzwerk Al-Kaida verbündet ist.

    Man ist mit jemandem verbündet. :tick:
    *Man wird mit jemandem verbündet. :cross:
    Man verbündet sich mit jemandem. :tick:
     
  3. Dupon Senior Member

    Chinese
    Because verbünden is a v/r, so it does have the passive mode.
    But do you miss "sich" in "Man ist mit jemandem verbündet." which is a perfect tense?
    And in "die mit dem Terrornetzwerk Al-Kaida verbündete radikal-islamische Shabaab-Miliz", there is also no "sich".

    In
    participle phrase, when it is past participle of a vt., then it should be changed into passive mode clause.(It will be meaningless to change it into a perfect tense)
    Example: "viel gelesene Bücher" could be changed to "Bücher, die viel gelesen werden."

    when it is a past participle of a v/r or vi., it should be changed into perfect tense.
    Example: das vor drei Tagen aus meiner Schublade verschwundene Dossier.(das Dossier, das vor drei Tagen aus meiner Schublade verschwunden ist).

    Thank!
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2014
  4. Schimmelreiter

    Schimmelreiter Senior Member

    Deutsch
    Man ist mit jemandem verbündet is stative passive voice, Präsens.

    Man hat sich mit jemandem verbündet is active voice, Perfekt.


    To avoid confusion, English terms should not be used for German tenses.



    PS
    The stative passive voice has a perfective aspect:

    Nachdem man sich verbündet hat, ist man verbündet.
    Nachdem man sich verbündet hatte, war man verbündet.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2014
  5. Dupon Senior Member

    Chinese
    Now I understand, in "Man ist mit jemandem verbündet", "ist" the auxiliary verb of stative passive voice.

    In the below sentence, "ist" is the auxiliary verb of the active voice, Perfekt. Correct? Because verschwinden is a vi.
    das vor drei Tagen aus meiner Schublade verschwundene Dossier.(das Dossier, das vor drei Tagen aus meiner Schublade verschwunden ist).

     
  6. ablativ Senior Member

    German(y)
    Jemand deckt den Tisch: active voice ('Tisch' = accusative)

    Der Tisch ist gedeckt: stative passive voice ('Tisch' = nominative)

    Man verbündet sich mit jemandem: reflexive active voice ('man' = nominative)

    Man ist mit jemandem verbündet: stative reflexivity ("Zustandsreflexiv") ('man' = nominative, too); no passive voice because *Man wird mit jemandem verbündet. :cross: (Post 2)
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2014
  7. ablativ Senior Member

    German(y)
    Der Hund verschwindet im Wald: active voice, Präsens

    Der Hund ist im Wald verschwunden: active v., Perfekt ("verschwinden = intransitive, no passive v. possible)

    Ich wasche mich: active voice of a reflexive verb, Präsens ---> Ich bin gewaschen: Zustandsreflexiv, active, Präsens

    Ich bin gewaschen gewesen: Zustandsrefl., active, ​Perfekt

    Another example: Ich meine das Dossier (act., Präsens), das vor drei Tagen verschwunden ist.

    Hiermit ist das Dossier gemeint ("allgemeiner Zustand", kein Passiv, Perfekt), das vor drei Tagen verschwunden ist.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2014
  8. Schimmelreiter

    Schimmelreiter Senior Member

    Deutsch
    I used the English term stative passive voice. I searched for a term, in English, that describes the phenomenon under discussion with regard to German, to no avail. In no description of German grammar could I find either stative reflexive or stative reflexivity. I may not have searched enough.


    Canoo gives a good description of Zustandsreflexiv.


    Interestingly, The Free Dictionary states:

    verbünden - oft im Zustandspassiv verwendet: Frankreich und Deutschland sind (miteinander) verbündet.


    Also, for instance, the German Philology Department (Germanistik) of the University of Freiburg states on its website:

    Das Zustandspassiv wird mit dem Hilfsverb "sein" gebildet.
    Beispiel: gewaschen sein; gewählt sein; verschlossen sein; verbündet sein; betrunken sein.


    All those that do not distinguish between Zustandspassiv and Zustandsreflexiv do not imply, of course, that sich verbünden cannot be put into the passive voice but that it cannot be put into the eventive passive voice.
     
  9. ablativ Senior Member

    German(y)
    There may be different interpretations and an inconsistent terminology.

    Do you see any passive meaning in "betrunken sein"? Ich betrinke mich und danach bin ich betrunken.
    Zustandspassiv? I would definitely call it Zustandsreflexiv.

    Ich wasche den Hund. Der Hund ist danach gewaschen. Yes, that's Zustandpassiv.

    Ich wasche mich. Und danach bin ich gewaschen. I would still call it "Zustandsreflexiv" but it may be a little more "Zustandspassiv" than "ich bin betrunken".

    Zustandsreflexiv: Das Kind ist gewaschen. « Das Kind hat sich gewaschen.Zustandspassiv: Das Kind ist gewaschen. « Die Mutter hat das Kind gewaschen.(canoonet)

    Wikipedia , Wirtschaftsdeutsch , germanische Linguistik , canoonet

    Wiktionary:
    ('sich verbünden' u. 'sich verloben' unterscheiden sich doch hinsichtlich der hier angesprochenen Thematik nur unwesentlich.)

    "Bestimmte Länder sind zwangsverbündet worden" - "In der Türkei werden immer noch viele Mädchen zwangsverlobt/-verheiratet." Kind of passive voice - perhaps ... and in that case the Zustandspassiv could be possible - perhaps ...

    Maybe we should not insist on our own terminology.
     
  10. Schimmelreiter

    Schimmelreiter Senior Member

    Deutsch
    I do not insist on calling verbündet Zustandspassiv. On the contrary, your, canoo's and many others' terminology of Zustandsreflexiv is by far superior. Believe it or not, it's also "my" terminology. I'm a great fan of canoo's:
    My personal issue was that while I was writing in English, trying to be clear to a member that had asked a question in English, I was trying to find an English explanation, which I didn't find (see what I wrote about no such thing as stative reflexive/reflexivity being common with regard to German as far as I saw). Then I found the entries in The Free Dictionary and on the Freiburg University site that I quoted and saw that they spoke of Zustandspassiv with regard to verbündet, so I took it to include Zustandsreflexiv as a subcategory rather than treat it as something different.

    That was my mistake. I'd better have stuck to German Zustandsreflexiv.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2014

Share This Page