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verbal commands to horses

Discussion in 'Nederlands (Dutch)' started by Lepus timidus, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. Lepus timidus

    Lepus timidus New Member

    Russian
    Hello,

    I would like to know what words would you use in Dutch to tell a horse to go forward, and to stop. For my ear, the first one sounded like a two-syllable word with rolling "r" in the middle (and a driver was reinforcing that "r" to make it easier for the horse to hear). Thank you in advance!
     
  2. Peterdg

    Peterdg Senior Member

    Belgium
    Dutch - Belgium
    In Belgium (Brabant area), the usual words are "juuu" to go forward and "hooow" to stop.
     
  3. Lepus timidus

    Lepus timidus New Member

    Russian
    Sorry, I did not mention the area. It was in Amsterdam, on their horse drawn carriage tour.
     
  4. Lopes

    Lopes Senior Member

    Brussels
    Dutch (Amsterdam)
    The only thing I can think of with an r is vort, but I'm not really an expert in horse language ;)
     
  5. Lepus timidus

    Lepus timidus New Member

    Russian
    Thank you, I think I am getting closer :confused: There is a thread I found about the "horse language", but it is all in Dutch: http://www.bokt.nl/forums/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=1292523&start=25
    I think what I actually heard was "vooruit" to go forward (with long "r") and "rustig" to slow down/stop (I did not hear any "hoo"s though).
    But I am not sure. How do you pronounce these words? and would it be normal to use these commands for a carriage horse?
     
  6. Grytolle Senior Member

    Swedish - Swedish
  7. Peterdg

    Peterdg Senior Member

    Belgium
    Dutch - Belgium
  8. p.rex New Member

    English
    This is an old thread but I came across it and thought I could help for anyone finding it in the future.

    The word you were hearing was 'draf' which means the driver was telling the horse to trot. The "R" is emphasized harshly, essentially as a rolled noise. There are several words for "stop" but usually 'ho' is used as it is in other languages.
     

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