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verbs contracted with particles...can the accent move?

Discussion in 'Ελληνικά (Greek)' started by alfie1888, Jan 11, 2013.

  1. alfie1888

    alfie1888 Senior Member

    Kent, England
    English - England
    I tried to make my title as clear and brief as possible. If you still don't understand, I'm going to explain here, anyway:

    My question is whether it is correct and acceptable to write θά 'θελα as opposed to θα 'θελα? I know in the old days it even used to be written as one word, θάθελα. In my mind, it makes sense to move the accent from the removed eta onto the alpha since we wouldn't know where to accentuate in speech... or at least, not a native speaker or a learner of Greek would.

    When I have been teaching (and also in personal correspondence), I've been writing it as θά 'θελα (mainly because I'm asked about pronunciation otherwise) but some of my friends have told me it's incorrect. One even said she'd never seen it written like that before (I later found out her Greek was actually quite bad for a native)!

    Anyway, hope that's enough information for you to be able to explain to me which is the form I should be writing in order to write good Greek well :).

    Many thanks in advance!
     
  2. Perseas Senior Member

    Athen
    Griechisch
    The correct is to write θα 'θελα. (I 've never seen it as one word, θάθελα)
    In Triandaphyllidis Grammar it says: When a verb form loses its accented syllable through prodelision the written accent is not shifted back to the preceding word: μου 'φερε, τα 'δειξε, θα 'θελα, να 'λεγε, μου 'πε, που 'ναι (but πού 'ναι), μου 'πε, etc.
     
  3. alfie1888

    alfie1888 Senior Member

    Kent, England
    English - England
    Duly noted! Shan't be making that mistake again! Thank you!
     
  4. alfie1888

    alfie1888 Senior Member

    Kent, England
    English - England
    And just to reiterate when I saw it as one word, it is usually in older books that use the polytonic system and it was written thus: θἄθελα. Very odd indeed. But likewise, τουλάχιστον, as a contracted word as well, used to be written as τοῦλάχιστον according to my "Greek: A Comprehensive Grammar to the Modern Language" in its description of the polytonic system formerly in use. I guess it must depend how old your are, or like me, how many old books you own (it's kinda my thing :p).
     
  5. Perseas Senior Member

    Athen
    Griechisch
    Ok, thanks. This phenomenon is called "κράση" and concerns the polytonic system.


    This is called "αφαίρεση": θα 'θελα, μου 'φερε.
    And this "έκθλιψη": θ' ακούσετε, απ' όλους.
     

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