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veretis

Discussion in 'Lingua Latina (Latin)' started by yasemin, Jan 20, 2013.

  1. yasemin Senior Member

    Turkey, Turkish
    Hi!
    Can you please help me with this phrase: 'quidquid instrumenti veretis aulae erat'?
    Whatever instruments the court had?? I don't understand the word veretis.
    Thanks in advance,
    yasemin
     
  2. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    Hallo.
    veretis is at least an unusual word, possibly a proper name, possibly an error. Some background and context is necessary here.

    (1) Background. Where does this text come from? From what period? Is it part of a legal document? Who wrote it?

    (2) Context. Please give more of the actual text from which this is taken.

    (3) Accuracy. Are you sure there is no error in the text? Could it be a mistake for Venetis?
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
  3. yasemin Senior Member

    Turkey, Turkish
    Hi wandle,
    Thank you very much for your message.
    Well, it's actually an English text, narrating a Roman auction.
    "(...) Caligula, who being short of money thought fit one day to put up to auction everything in the royal palace that was either useless or out of fashion, quidquid instrumenti veretis aulae erat."
    I think there might be a typo. Which word do you think was intended here?
     
  4. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    What English text?
     
  5. yasemin Senior Member

    Turkey, Turkish
    "(...) Caligula, who being short of money thought fit one day to put up to auction everything in the royal palace that was either useless or out of fashion, quidquid instrumenti veretis aulae erat."
    It's a book on the history of conservation.
     
  6. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    What is the title of the book, please, who is it by, and who is the Latin writer whom the author is quoting?
     
  7. yasemin Senior Member

    Turkey, Turkish
    Our architectural heritage: from consciousness to conservation
    by Cevat Erder
    Pliny
     
  8. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    Is it Pliny the Younger? Is the text from his Epistles?
     
  9. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    I have tried Pliny's Epistles online and not found it there.

    Latin instrumentum also means 'furniture', which must be the sense here.
    It is just possible that venetis may be a mistake for venustioris, comparative of venustus, beautiful or elegant.
    In that case, quidquid instrumenti venustioris aulae erat would mean 'whatever elegant furniture there was in the palace'.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
  10. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    On second thoughts, a far more likely textual possibility is veneris, genitive of venus meaning 'grace' or 'elegance'.
    Thus instrumentum veneris would mean 'furniture of elegance'. This yields the same translation as given above.
     
  11. yasemin Senior Member

    Turkey, Turkish
    It is Pliny the Older.
    In the meantime, I found "quidquid instrumenti veteris aulae erat" (whatever the old court has?), in the Life of Caligula by Suotenius. I can't understand if Pliny quotes from Suotenius in one of his letters though..
     
  12. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    quidquid instrumenti veteris aulae erat means 'whatever old furniture there was in the palace'.

    This must be the true reading.
    After all, even Caligula would be more likely to get rid of the old furniture rather than the elegant.
     
  13. yasemin Senior Member

    Turkey, Turkish
    Right! Thank you so much wandle!!
     

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