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Viam veræ fidei & veritatis errantium turba, licet...

Discussion in 'Lingua Latina (Latin)' started by Diadem, Mar 9, 2013.

  1. Diadem Senior Member

    USA (English)
    Pugio Fidei (Paris edition), Pars Prima, Caput Primum, Heading I (1.1.1), p. 154.

    Viam veræ fidei & veritatis errantium turba, licet quodammodo sit incomprehensibilis, & infinita, potest tamen quodammodo sub duplici distincitone concludi. Quicunque enim à fidei veritate exorbitant vel sunt habentes legem, vel minimè legem nisi naturalem habentes.​

    This is my rough translation. Can someone critique it?

    The multitude of errors from the way of the true faith and truth is permitted to be incomprehensible and infinite, nevertheless, it can be specifically defined under a two-fold distinction. For, whoever either deviates from the true faith, or are having the Law, or least of all, if not naturally having the Law.​
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2013
  2. jrundin Senior Member

    USA, English
    "The number of those missing the path of true faith and truth, although it is innumerable and boundless, can, nevertheless, be grouped under a two-fold categorization. For all those who leave the wheel-ruts either are those who have law, or who have no law at all except natural [law]."

    Gosh, I think I'm getting to know Pugio's style. His Latin ain't half bad.

    "exorbito" is a weird image for moderns. It's a post-classical word. It refers to what happens
    when a cart jumps out of the normal ruts made by standard wheels on a traditional road.
     
  3. Diadem Senior Member

    USA (English)
    Is licet typically translated as "although"? And, how are you translating quodammodo?

    Thank you for your translation. Can't thank you enough. It really helps me to understand his style as well. I'm learning by immersion. It's quite obvious you have a strong grasp of Latin.
     
  4. jrundin Senior Member

    USA, English
    Yes, "licet" can mean "although."

    In earlier Latin, "licet" means "it is permitted."

    However, in later Latin, it comes to be used with a subjunctive to mean "although."
     
  5. jrundin Senior Member

    USA, English
    Oops! I did leave out the quodammodo. It means "a certain." So it should be "under a certain two-fold categorization."




    "
     
  6. jrundin Senior Member

    USA, English
    Oh, and I could not figure out a good one-word English translation for "incomprehensibilis." I said "innumerable."
    By "incomprehensibilis," he means that they defy analysis. They cannot (in- -bilis) be grasped (-prehens-) all at once (-com-).
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2013
  7. jrundin Senior Member

    USA, English
    Actually, I take that back about quodammodo. I wasn't paying close attention to the passage
    when I first answered. I now notice that there are two "quodammodo"s.
    I now think this author is using the word to mean "somehow." Here he's using them to heighten
    the contrast in the "although."

    So, once more:

    "The number of those missing the path of true faith and truth, although it is somehow intractable and boundless, can, nevertheless, somehow be grouped under a two-fold categorization. For all those who leave the wheel-ruts either are those who have law, or who have no law at all except natural [law]."
     

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