1. nyc10026 Junior Member

    Manhattan
    English ( U.S. )
    What "level" of speech is "vieux schnoque" ? Does it have a vulgar connotation ? In English, " old fart " is sort of "cute" and not disrespectful but a gentle sort of kidding around that someone is old. I have just turned 60 and want to write "une petite redaction" for a french class and refer to myself as " un vieux schnoque ". Would that seem bizarre or unsavoury ?
     
  2. International Jools Senior Member

    Brazil
    Français, France
    it's familiar, pejorative and disrespectful...
     
  3. International Jools Senior Member

    Brazil
    Français, France
    Maybe it's like ' you old schmuck!"
     
  4. International Jools Senior Member

    Brazil
    Français, France
    If you say this, French students would be likely to laugh , I guess, they'd consider you're being sarcastic, depends on the ton of your voice. But in other situations, don't call the others that way, if you know what I mean.
     
  5. nyc10026 Junior Member

    Manhattan
    English ( U.S. )
    Thank you Jools ( Jewels ? Jules ? ) I suppose I am not yet at that stage of learning French where I can be casual and speak with self-deprecating good humor. I will not use "vieux schnoque". :) Thanks anyway. I will try another route ....
     
  6. Tochka Senior Member

    is may be
    I'd be wary of stating this as an absolute to non-native speakers. As I suspect is the case with vieux schnoque, whether "old fart" is acceptable to say in English will very much depend on your audience, and as International Jools points out, your tone.
    This, too, is one to be cautious about if you're a non-native speaker! ;) There are many who would find it offensive or, at best, crude.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2013
  7. nyc10026 Junior Member

    Manhattan
    English ( U.S. )
    Yes Tochka I can see that "old fart" depends on context. If a stranger called me an "old fart" I would be ... miffed, at the least. But among friends I heard it plenty at my 60th birthday party ! Personally I do not find the phrase "crude". But I suppose I come from a more or less earthy farm family mid-west background in the USA and I've only heard it said in good humor. There are plenty more obviously "crude" ways of talking about old age ..... :)
     
  8. Lly4n4 Senior Member

    Paris (ex-Grand Ouest)
    Français (France)
    In this context, "vieux schnoque" could be OK, as you describe yourself with a joke.
    But I'd rather use "vieux pépé" or "papy" which are more friendly :)
     
  9. OutsinceMons

    OutsinceMons Senior Member

    France
    English GB
  10. petit1 Senior Member

    français - France
    an old fogey
     
  11. Micia93

    Micia93 Senior Member

    in the center of France
    FRANCE FRENCH
    What about "an old stager" ? (Saw it means "vieux de la vieille")
    Hi Petit! according to the WR dictionary, "fogey" is a very offensive (they translate it by "vieux croûton", "vieille bique" ...)
     
  12. petit1 Senior Member

    français - France
    vieux chnoque est aussi plutôt insultant; il y a la notion d'un peu fou.
    je pensais à quelque chose comme "une vieille baderne" "vieux radoteur" en français.
     
  13. Micia93

    Micia93 Senior Member

    in the center of France
    FRANCE FRENCH
    Oui c'est insultant, c'est pourquoi nyc ne l'a pas retenu pour traduire "old fart" qu'elle trouve "gentil" (voir post 1) :)
     
  14. VanOo

    VanOo Senior Member

    Paris, France
    Français - France
    I like "petit vieux".
     
  15. International Jools Senior Member

    Brazil
    Français, France
    Moi ,je dis 'vieille branche' si vous cherchez un terme soft pour 'vieux schnoque' mais on perd l'idée de fou tout comme dans 'petit vieux' , sinon 'un vieux maboule' mais c'est synonyme. Ahaha bon bref, ce n'était pas la question du thread , il me semble. Dans tous les cas, ces termes seront toujours irrespectueux et péjoratifs vue que la France a pour valeur essentielle le respect envers les personnes agées.
     
  16. Tochka Senior Member

    I've never heard "old stager"-- perhaps it's BE.1
    "Old fogey": this is a milder form of "old fart." It is not necessarily "very offensive", although it certainly can be. With both, it depends on circumstances, including how and to whom this is said. It is an insult, but can be said humorously. (C'est un mot à éviter si l'on ne connais pas bien ses auditeurs et ce que cela veut leur dire.)
    "Old fart": Note that "cute" is the register the OP was looking for, so that is what is relevant to finding the appropriate French. For the sake of the thread, however, I've noted that this expression will not be understood as "cute" by all anglophones in all contexts. (There is a diminishing, but still present, segment of anglophones who will not even use the word "fart" (péter) literally, because they consider it too rude to speak. When they need to refer to the act, other expressions such as "break wind" or "pass gas" are used instead.)

    @ nyc10026 re:
    Not to worry, my comment wasn't meant to call you out on your usage--it was just meant to warn the non-natives to be careful, since it's not universally considered innocuous. Although your statement was meant to help find the right register for Schnoque, I was concerned that others reading the thread might mistakenly think "old fart" is universally understood as a joking reference in English, which could cause problems with the wrong audience. You wouldn't want an innocent francophone to think it's "cute" to call a prospective upper-crust father-in-law an "old fart", for example! ;)
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2013

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