Vocabulary: before a surgery, the doctor makes a patient sleep

Discussion in 'English Only' started by roniy, Aug 23, 2006.

  1. roniy Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    before a surgery, the doctor makes a patient sleep.

    How do you call it?
    They put a machine on your mouth and nose and make you sleep so that you won't feel anything.

    How is that called ?
     
  2. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    I think the word you're looking for is "anaesthesia."

    (The surgeon administers an "anaesthetic.")
     
  3. Brian P

    Brian P Senior Member

    "anaesthesia" is British orthography. In the USA it is spelled ("spelt" in BE) "anesthesia". However, this is the name for the gas and other chemicals that put the patient to sleep. I think that the "machine" to which you refer is a "respirator", a tube that is inserted into the trachea, and through which the gas is administered.

    Do we have any doctors in this Forum?!
     
  4. foxfirebrand

    foxfirebrand Senior Member

    The Northern Rockies
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    You are anaesthetized before an operation. Or "put under." "Put to sleep" is a euphemism for euthanasia.

    I'm not quibbling with people who say the AE spelling is "anesthetized," but the ae version is also used here. I'm sure some of our Brit friends cringe at the ending with a Z, though.
    .
     
  5. roniy Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    Clear.

    Thank you :)
     
  6. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Just to be clear, roniy, what you described was the way anaesthetic gases used to be administered - using a mask over the patient's nose and mouth.

    Anaesthesiology is more sophisticated these days - most of the time.
    First come the happy pills.
    Then the intravenous thingy on the back of your hand.
    A quick dose of something through the intravenous thingy and next thing it's "Hello nurse, why's my throat sore?" in the recovery suite.
    The tube that Brian P referred to is inserted during that black consciousness gap and then the machine does all the breathing for you.
    It gets removed before you are aware enough to realise what's going on.
     
  7. boonognog Senior Member

    Charlotte, NC
    English (U.S.)
    Also, the surgeon doesn't administer the anaesthesia. The anaesthetist does that, and is supposed to constantly monitor the patient during the procedure.

    I should also point out the error in the initial statement:

    Before a surgery, the doctor makes a patient sleep.

    In English, at least here in the US, we don't say "a surgery". We might say "the surgery" under circumstances about a specific procedure.

    Instead, if speaking about surgeries in general, you would hear a native speaker say:

    Before surgery, the patient is administered an anaesthetic.

    If speaking about a specific surgical procedure, you would probably hear:

    Before the procedure, the patient will be administered an anaesthetic.
     
  8. padredeocho Senior Member

    United States
    In the USA, the "doctor" that puts somebody to sleep is the anesthesiologist (sp?), and he "puts the patient to sleep". This is odd, because if you say, "The vet put the dog to sleep," it means the veterinarian KILLED the dog to put it out of its misery.
     
  9. nelliot53

    nelliot53 Senior Member

    Puerto Rico
    Spanish [PR], English [US]
    Greetings.

    During many operations, however, the patient is not always induced completely into sleep. Not if the surgical team uses "Spinal Block Anesthesia"- they just numb you from your waist down, and you remain wide awake.
     
  10. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Indeed, nelliot53, and sometimes they do both!!
     
  11. padredeocho Senior Member

    United States
    My wife just gave birth, and they call that an epideral. I agree with panjadrum, too.
     
  12. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)

Share This Page