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voulut dire / Ce mot veut dire

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by Le Chat dormant, May 27, 2006.

  1. Le Chat dormant New Member

    English, Singapore
    Hi, all

    I have several questions arising from an essay I wrote and am hoping for some clarification as to why I got corrected. To allow separate consideration of each question, I have split each into a separate post which I hope is OK. Well, here's question 1.

    I had written : Plus qu'un objet, le Graal - un mot d'origine provencale qui VOLUT dire « récipient » - ...

    It was changed to : Plus qu'un objet, le Graal - un mot d'origine provencale qui VEUT dire « récipient » - ...

    What I'm puzzled about is this : since the word I was referring to was in a dead language, do you say that it "means" or it "meant"?

    Thanks! :)

    LCD
     
  2. yojan Junior Member

    London
    English - England
    Oui, bien que le mot aie l'origine de langue morte, il veut dire encore ''recipient''. N'est-ce pas?

    The word still means ''recepient'' inspite of the fact that its not used anymore. The meaning didn't change. Well thats my opinion.
     
  3. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    And is provençale completely dead? I thought not, but am not sure.
     
  4. Le Chat dormant New Member

    English, Singapore
    Good points, thanks. I believe in English, either past or present is possible. So, one can say, "In Neanderthal, the word 'oogah' means 'to like'," or "In Neanderthal, the word 'oogah' meant 'to like'." At least, a search on the internet turned up both versions. A similiar search on the internet in French only turned up instances of "veut dire". I can't say that this is conclusive but it does suggest a difference in usage between English and French. Any thoughts?
     
  5. Lapinbleu

    Lapinbleu Junior Member

    Douarnenez, Bretagne.
    British English, UK
    The fact that a language is dead, and in the case of Provençal I disagree strongly, does not mean that its words no longer "mean". That's like saying that a Latin word no longer "means" what it says because almost no-one speaks Latin these days... Words do not lose their meaning, and I think the correction was.... correct.
     
  6. EnIrAc

    EnIrAc Senior Member

    Hi, Le Chat Dormant :)

    Plus qu'un objet, le Graal - un mot d'origine provencale qui VEUT dire « récipient » est correct. Mais mieux encore tu devrais écrire : Plus qu'un objet, le Graal - un mot d'origine provençale signifie "récipient" .
    Si ça peut t'aider ... :idea:
     

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