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Vuoi che faccia il caffè?

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by peter2108, Jul 15, 2013.

  1. peter2108 Junior Member

    Vuoi che io faccia il caffè? (Do you want me to make the coffee?)
    Vuoi che tu faccia il caffè? (Do you want to make the coffee?)

    Would Italian speakers find Vuoi che faccia il caffè ambiguous?
     
  2. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    The second sentence is plain wrong.. How can someone ask themselves if the want them to make coffee?
    There's no ambiguity, only the first one makes sense.
     
  3. peter2108 Junior Member

    So how does one say "Do you want to make the coffee"?
     
  4. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Vuoi fare tu il caffè?
     
  5. peter2108 Junior Member

    Grazie, ma non capisco.
     
  6. merse0 Senior Member

    Verona
    Italy - Italian
    Do you want = vuoi tu
    To make = fare
    The coffee = il caffè

    Vuoi tu fare il caffè?, ma in italiano suona meglio spostando il "tu".
    Vuoi fare tu il caffè? (come ha scritto Paul).
     
  7. Passante

    Passante Senior Member

    Bologna
    italian
    Do you (tu) want (Vuoi) to make (fare) the coffeee (il caffè)? = Vuoi fare il caffè?

    Vuoi che faccia il caffè? se siamo più di due è ambiguo non saprei chi è il soggetto se io o un altro
    ma se dici Vuoi che io faccia il caffè? Vuoi che lui/lei faccia il caffè? é chiaro

    Nella prima non si usa il congiuntivo è una domanda diretta non si dice '(tu) vuoi che tu faccia'... ma 'vuoi fare?'

    Forse è più chiaro ora?
     
  8. L'Enrico Senior Member

    Italiano
    It's the construction of the verb volere. When the subject of both verbs is the same, volere is followed the infinitive of the second verb.
    - Vuoi fare (tu) il caffè?

    You should note that Italian verbs do not need a pronoun for a subject. If you insert a pronoun, it reads with emphasis.
    - Vuoi che faccia il caffè? - Plain sentence. You're just asking if the person wants you to make the coffee.
    - Vuoi che io faccia il caffè? - This reads with a stress on "io": Do you want me(!) to make the coffee?!? (Why don't you make it for a change.)

    E.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2013
  9. peter2108 Junior Member

    Ah, ora capisco meglio. Grazie a tutti
     
  10. optimistinella New Member

    Serbian-Serbia
    I think that the pronouns are usually omitted in Italian, as L"Enrico suggested, unless the subject needs to be emphasized for some reason: "Vuoi fare il caffè?" is more common, while "Vuoi fare tu il caffè?" would be asked if we want to stress "you". For example, I was supposed to make a coffee and then I am asking you if you want to make it. However, in the cases where subjunctive is used, I think that it is okay to use a pronoun since the forms of Present subjunctive are the same for all three persons singular, so in order to be precise it is better to use it, at least that is what I learned. (Vuoi che io faccia il caffè? Vuoi che Maria faccia il caffè?) native Italian speakers, please correct me if I am wrong. Now, I am confused with the sentence in English. Why did you say "the coffee"? I noticed that people usually to say "a coffee" in this case: "Would you like me to make a coffee?", "Would you like a coffee?" or is it just because you were translating a definite article from Italian. Maybe in some cases you would say "the coffee", but I never heard "Would you like the coffee?" Please correct me if I am wrong. Thanks. Grazie.
     
  11. AshleySarah

    AshleySarah Senior Member

    Australia
    English - N.Ireland
    "Now, I am confused with the sentence in English. Why did you say "the coffee"? I noticed that people usually to say "a coffee" in this case: "Would you like me to make a coffee?", "Would you like a coffee?" or is it just because you were translating a definite article from Italian. Maybe in some cases you would say "the coffee", but I never heard "Would you like the coffee?" Please correct me if I am wrong."

    Ciao optimistinella, I'll try to clarify this for you. Normally, when speaking to a guest/dinner companion, one would say "Would you like a/some coffee?". There are very few instances where one would say "Would you like the coffee?". One example would be if it's a choice between tea and coffee, one could say "Would you like/prefer the tea/the coffee?". When asking someone a question in regard to the expected final course of a meal, one could say "Would you like (or like me) to make the coffee?". Hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2013
  12. Passante

    Passante Senior Member

    Bologna
    italian
    :thumbsup:
     
  13. peter2108 Junior Member

    The usage Would you like me to make the coffee is common in British English. It is said when the speaker and the hearer are assumed to be thinking about the same coffee. So if each day at eleven o'clock you and your co-worker have a coffee then at 10.55 you would say Shall I make the coffee today? Or suppose a family is on a visit and it is time to go home the father says Shall I get the car? and before they set out he may have said Go and get the children. If someone enters a room you can say Will you close the door? Whenever the object is thought of as unique amongst the speakers then you use "the".
     
  14. optimistinella New Member

    Serbian-Serbia
    Yes, it does. Thanks a lot, AshleySarah and Peter 2108.
     
  15. L'Enrico Senior Member

    Italiano
    Incidentally, it should be noted that the most common utterance in Italian would be
    - Faccio il caffè?

    By explicitly adding Vuoi che..., you might be suggesting that there's something in the situation that would oppose your making the coffee – you previously noted that you are too tired to even stand up, the other person hinted at the fact that they don't want their usual coffee, and so forth.

    E.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2013

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