wa habibi by Fairouz

Discussion in 'العربية (Arabic)' started by metis, Jul 8, 2006.

  1. metis

    metis Junior Member

    venice
    italian italy
    hi to everyone:) I am looking for the lyrics in arabic and the translation of the song by fairouz "ya habibi". I think it is a good friday hymn used in the middle eastern catholic liturgy. anyone can help me? thank you all in advance.
    p.s. where can I find arabic fonts?
     
  2. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Hello Metis,
    I did some searching and found a very interesting page with all the Good Friday hymns of Fayrouz. You can listen to the songs and read the lyrics. By the way, the song title is wa Habibi (=Oh my love).
    I'll post the first four line only (in respect of the forum's copyrights rules) and you can check the others in that page.

    وا حبيبي وا حبيبي أي حال أنت فيه
    من رآك فشجاك أنت أنت المفتدي
    يا حبيبي أي ذنب حمل العدل بنيه
    فأزادوك جراحاً ليس فيها من شفاء

    As for the translation, it's a bit hard for me, specially that I don't have much time; but I'll try to give you a quick and rough one. If your Arabic level is ok, so you can manage the totality of the text than post some questions in the forum (but don't try to go around the 4-lines rule by posting the 8 lines in 2 or more threads ;) because they will be deleted :) )

    Here's my take in the translation :

    Oh my love oh my love in what condition are you
    Whoever sees you and pitty you, you you are the sacrifier
    Oh my love what sin did just hold on its sons
    so they gave you more wounds that can't heal

    As you see, it's a very poor quality translation, but I hope it give the rough meaning.

    Cherine

     
  3. CarlosPerezMartinez Senior Member

    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Spain, Spanish

    Wonderful web site, Cherine, الف شكر
     
  4. J.F. de TROYES Senior Member

    francais-France
    وا حبيبي وا حبيبي أي حال أنت فيه


    من رآك فشجاك أنت أنت المفتدي
    يا حبيبي أي ذنب حمل العدل بنيه

    فأزادوك جراحاً ليس فيها من شفاء ​




    Thanks a lot, Cherine, for introducing us to this site. Great! As i am trying to understand this verse, your translation is a good help; though i looked up words in my dictionary too,i am coming up with some difficulties:

    بنيه
    Is it a "majruur maksuur" ? What is it subordinate to ? What name the suffixe pronoun replace ?





    أزادوك

    What is the root, "zaad" or "ziid"; i suppose it's the first, but i don't find this form (4th ?)

    I'm just hypothesizing; maybe all that does'nt make sense !

    المفتادي

    Could it be translated by "the Redeemer" ?




     
  5. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    You're welcome Carlos :)

    No, it's maf3uul bihi :
    7ammala 'l-3adlu baniih(i) حَمَّل العدلُ بنيه
    7ammala : فعل ماضٍ , al-3adlu : فاعل , baniih مفعول به مجرور بالياء لأنه جمع
    The suffixe pronoun بنيه refer to al-3adl : the sons of justice (I didn't understand this sentence very much myself)


    The root is ز-ي-د and the form is indeed a bit rare with this verb. Maybe the alef was used just to suite the rythm of the verse (which is quite a common thing in Arabic poetry).

    Yes, المفتدي can be the Redeemer.

    Sorry again for my poor translation :(
     
  6. J.F. de TROYES Senior Member

    francais-France
    اهلاًًًً بك
    Thank you very much for your help. Now it becomes clearer to me; yes, it's "7mmal" with a shedda , as i understood when listening to Fayruz on the web site. But i am sorry, i don't yet understand the form :
    بني
    as a plural
    My dictionary gives only "2bnaa2" or "bnuun"
     
  7. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Bhe plural of ibn ابن is indeed abnaa2 أبناء and banuun بنون .
    But, banuun being a masculine plural, become baniin in النصب والجر (sorry, I still can't learn how to say these in Englis) and it looses the final "n" in the iDafa.

    If it's still not clear, please let me know.
     
  8. CarlosPerezMartinez Senior Member

    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Spain, Spanish
    Hello, Cherine, interesting translation but: can العدل mean not only justice but The Just (i.e. God). If this is the case the translation would be "What sin did God load on his sons/or whatever sins did God load on his sons then ازادوك جراحا they intensified the wounds on you" According to the Christian beliefs Christ died to redeem mankind from their sins.
    Will the text be more clear under this interpretation?
     
  9. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Hello Carlos,
    Your interpretation makes sense. I think you're more qualified to understand/interpret this text than I am (with a Christian backrgound/culture(?) ).
    If you'd like to propose your translation, I'll be honored to learn from you :)
     
  10. CarlosPerezMartinez Senior Member

    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Spain, Spanish
    Hello, Cherine, thank you but let me tell you that I am the one who is learning here ;) .
    On the other hand my interpretation of the song (better than a direct translation) is based as you said in my Christian backgroung. Fayrouz is watching a picture or sculpture of Christ in the cross. He is completely wounded and bleeding. Then she asks: What kind of sins did God put on His sons that you had to be so badly wounded in order to redeem them? Were our sins so bad that you deserved so much wounds? I think this is the idea of the song, but is just a wild guess.

    May be any Christian Lebanese could help us more!
     
  11. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Au contraire Carlos :) let me tell you from my own experience that I -a native speaker- learn a lot from many learners' contributions. Just as I profited from your previous interpretation.

    Interpretation can be the first step towards a better translation, right ? :)

    I admit I could never thought of it this way -different conception, due to different religion- So, I'd repeat what I said in my first post: mine is a very poor quality translation. But I hope I could help by giving a hint of what's the song is about.
     
  12. ayed

    ayed Senior Member

    Riyadh
    Arabic
    What about :
    al-Fadi :the Redeemer

    الفادي :اسم فاعل
    Would it fit here?
     
  13. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Both are correct Ayed, الفادي from the verb فَدَى and المفتدي from the verb اِفْـتـَـدَى and I think they have -almost- the same meaning.
     
  14. J.F. de TROYES Senior Member

    francais-France

    Yes, it's quite clear; thanks for reminding me of rules of grammar I hade quite forgotten.

    One more question about:

    كيف تمضي أترى (ضاع الوفاء)



    Does this form come from the root:


    ترى

    If it is, the dictionary gives me only a verb and I don't see how to understand the sentence.

    Excuse me for all these boring questions.
     
  15. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Not at all, questions are always welcome :)

    Yes, the root is the verb رأى (see), the first hamza is the همزة الاستفهام . This structure أَتـُرَى atura means "I wonder" (like "I'm astonished/amazed").
     
  16. J.F. de TROYES Senior Member

    francais-France
    اهلاًًًً بك

    I'like to try to translate this Fayruz's song, but i am coming up with many difficulties; so i am still asking for your help or somebody's else help.

    1- Is فشجاك a verbal form I or II

    2- I suppose تناديه is الخطب of نادى (to call, to summon), but what about الشفاء . Unles tis word is feminine and الفاعل .I don't think so; or the sentence may be analysed another way ?

    3- كيف تمضي What does this mean here? "to get away" ? "How are you getting away "

    Thanking you in advance .
     
  17. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    I'm not sure what form I and II are. But this word is the verb شَجَى which is على وزن فَعَل (Form I maybe ?) The "f" is a letter connoting a consequence.

    What's الخطب ?
    What I know is that تناديه is the present form of نادى (on a second "look", I think it could better be يناديه but I'm not sure) I'm saying this because I guess يناديه الشفاء would mean -in this context- ask Him to heal them.

    It means "to leave" ("partir" en French).
     
  18. CarlosPerezMartinez Senior Member

    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Spain, Spanish
    Can شجر be masculine first and then feminine? It happens with collective nouns. If that is the case the sentence would be: The olive tree is crying and is calling for a cure for Him. شجر الزيتون يبكي وتناديه الشفاء The use of و instead of ف gives the idea that the subject of both sentences is the same (i.e. the tree or trees).
     
  19. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Shajar is masculine (I've never seen it used with feminine).
    I still don't have an explanation for the change of gender here. Maybe a mistake ?
     
  20. J.F. de TROYES Senior Member

    francais-France
    What's الخطب ?

    Sorry for the mistake; I should have written : " الخاطب " , I mean the 2st. person singular with the sense of "You call me for recovering". but now I think I am wrong.
     
  21. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Oh, you mean al-mukhatab المخاطب :)
     
  22. Mery_Dian

    Mery_Dian Junior Member

    Morocco
    Moroccan Arabic - Morocco
    Hi everyone,

    I think that الشفاء is not used here as : cure or recovery; otherwise, the sentence would be very awkward.

    I guess that there is a spelling mistake or a deliberate substitution of "ه" by the final hamza to stick to the rhyme. So, I assume that the appropriate word is "الشفاه", which is the plural form of شفة (Lip).

    Thus, the verse would more or less mean "The olive tree is crying, and the lips are calling out to him"

    Does it make sense?
     
  23. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    YES! :thumbsup:

    That must be it. Brilliant, Mery_Dian.

    I wasn't convinced by any of the other interpretations - not only because of the gender problem but also because تناديه الشفاء does not mean "ask Him to heal them" or "call for a cure for Him."

    Your suggestion, however, is correct both syntactically and semantically.
     
  24. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Very brilliant indeed :thumbsup: and great explanation :thumbsup:
    It makes a lot more sense than my interpretation :)
     
  25. CarlosPerezMartinez Senior Member

    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Spain, Spanish
    From "A Grammar of the Arabic Language" by W.Wright, volume i, page 180:

    292. Masculine or feminine are:
    (a) Collective nouns (أسماء الجنس ), chiefly denoting animals and plants, which form a nomen unitatis; e.g. حمام pigeons, شاء sheep or goats, بقر cattle, جراد grasshoppers, locusts, نحل bees, شجر trees, ... .
     
  26. oblogos New Member

    Hungarian&English
    Dear Everybody,
    Being a new member I send my greetings to everyone! Some days ago I found a beautiful hymn, it's title is "Wa habibi"(In the performance of Fairouz.) I decided to learn it, but I can not read the original text in arabic. Could someone send me an english phonetic variation of it if it's possible? (At least of the first strophe. The translation I have already got .) Thank you very much!!!
    Oblogos
     

Share This Page