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  1. Eudald Junior Member

    Catalonia, Spain
    Catalan, Spanish, Spain
    Hello:
    In The Vicar of Wakefield, chapter 22, I find this sentence: "As I walked but slowly, the night wained apace."
    What does "wained" mean? Is it a misspelling for the past tense of "wane"?
    Thank you.
     
  2. Bigote Blanco Senior Member

    I believe "wained" means or implies "went away slowly"
    The sound wained= the sound decreased slowly
    The night wained= the night gradually passed until it ended.

    I stand to be corrected.
     
  3. Masood Senior Member

    Leicester, England
    British English
    Hola

    De acuerdo con la explicación dada por Bigote Blanco.

    "...la noche disminuía..."
     
  4. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Me parece que tiene que ser "wane" (menguar), mal escrito.
    "To wain" no existe ni en Merriam-Webster's ni en el Oxford.
     
  5. goodoldave Senior Member

    Missouri USA
    English - USA
    The Vicar of Wakefield was written in the 1700's so I think that "wained" is an archaic spelling of "waned'.

    Dave
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2010
  6. Bigote Blanco Senior Member

    It didn't look correct and I didn't check it out. A glaring error! I stand corrected. Thanks Aztlaniano!
     
  7. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    This explains it. It was not an error when it was written, only now:
     
  8. spodulike

    spodulike Senior Member

    Brighton, England
    English - England
    No, I think it is an archaic mis-spelling :D ..A "wain" was and is a wagon. The etymology is different and so has the spelling been for a long time.
     
  9. Eudald Junior Member

    Catalonia, Spain
    Catalan, Spanish, Spain
    But I think the meaning of the sentence implies that the night increased, (grew darker) and fast.
    What do you think about "As I walked but slowly, the night advanced inexorably and fast".
     
  10. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Diría the night went by quickly.
     
  11. spodulike

    spodulike Senior Member

    Brighton, England
    English - England
    Having read the wider context, http://www.fullbooks.com/The-Vicar-of-Wakefield3.html, it is clear that the night was drawing on. I think the author is confused about the meaning and the spelling of the word.

    NOTE
    "to wane" to shrink ... and in that sense Aztlaniano is right but I am not convinced that the author knew the true meaning.
    "to wax" to grow
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2010
  12. spodulike

    spodulike Senior Member

    Brighton, England
    English - England
    Etymology of "wain" and "wane" http://www.etymonline.com/

    wain
    O.E. wægn "wheeled vehicle," from P.Gmc. *wagnaz (see wagon). Largely fallen from use by c.1600, but kept alive by poets, who found it easier to rhyme on thanwagon. Wainwright "wagon-builder" is O.E. wægn-wyrhta.


    wane
    O.E. wanian "make or become smaller gradually," from P.Gmc. *wanojanan (cf. O.S. wanon, O.N. vana, O.Fris. wania, M.Du. waenen, O.H.G. wanon "to wane, to grow less"), from *wano- "lacking," from PIE *we-no-, from base *eue- "to leave, abandon, give out" (see vain). Related: waned, wanes.
     

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