1. NKOS

    NKOS Junior Member

    Mumbai, India
    English & Hindi
    Hi


    I'm looking for the french equivalent of
    'She wanders over to the rose bed... (where the roses were in bloom)


    which would be approppriate here for the word 'to wander over' -
    errer / flaner / déambuler / dévier / se diriger / promener


    eg.
    Elle erre sur le lit de rose
    Elle flâne vers le lit de rose
    Elle déambule vers le lit de rose
    Elle dévie vers le lit de rose
    Elle se dirige vers le lit de rose
    Elle se promène sur le lit de rose

    And how would they vary from each other?


    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Bâton-courageux Junior Member

    North Africa
    French - Français
    Hello NKOS ,

    Elle flâne/ se promène is more like she's strolling/she's having a stroll or a walk
    Elle se dirige vers ->she's headed to (not very appropriate for this use, because it would imply that she's not near the rose bed yet)

    Errer is more for souls and ghosts than it is for human being

    the most appropriate one accroding to me is : Elle se promène autour du lit de roses

    Edit:


    the difference between flâner and se promener is that flâner is done in a most "non-worried" way

    errer can be designed as a walk without any specific purpose
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2013
  3. NKOS

    NKOS Junior Member

    Mumbai, India
    English & Hindi
    Thanks. I was wondering about the difference between [errer / flaner / déambuler / dévier / se diriger / promener].
    I guess '
    promener' & 'flaner' both seem appropriate, since the context is of a person strolling or wandering in a garden engrossed in her own thoughts.
    Thank you for putting it in perspective.
     
  4. Bâton-courageux Junior Member

    North Africa
    French - Français
    you're welcome NKOS, I must however warn you that "flâner" is not very common nowadays ,even if it's a synonymous, its meaning is a little bit more stronger than "se promener / se balader". it's more literary somehow

    it's usually used by poets rather than street people
     
  5. NKOS

    NKOS Junior Member

    Mumbai, India
    English & Hindi
    Thanks for your input.
    However, the relevant phrase belongs to a literary work around 7 decades back, somewhere in 1945, so maybe, the word 'flaner' may have been in circulation then, or it may add provide the vintage tone.
    Although I agree that 'promener & balader' too are quite appropriate here.

    Another issue is that the word 'promène autour' stands for 'stroll around', whereas the phrase mentions 'to stroll over to' (to head to, in the direction of , reach...),
    hence maybe 'vers' would be a better equivalent, as in "elle promène vers le lit de roses" or "elle promène sur le lit de roses".
    Please correct me if I'm wrong.
    Merci.
     
  6. moustic Senior Member

    near Limoges
    British English
    My try:
    ... elle se dirige nonchalamment vers le parterre de roses ...
     
  7. Bâton-courageux Junior Member

    North Africa
    French - Français
    beware NKOS , it's "se promener / se balader" not "promener / balader" => then it will be "elle se promène / elle se balade" , but flâner comes alone (without se) "elle flâne" [talking in your context]

    if you say "elle promène" that means that she's making someone have a stroll (by considering that she is somehow the leader of the stroll) , like "elle promène son chien dans le parc"

    if you say "elle balade" (without se) it means that she's telling someone bollocks (bullshiting him) and making him believe it , like "elle le balade pour avoir ce qu'elle cherche"

    however "elle balade" (without se)is informal , it's not vulgar but it's used as slang

    for answering your second issue about "stroll around" , you can say "elle se promène dans les environs" , "elle se promène aux environs"

    here's another "elle se promène à travers le champ de blé" -> "she's strolling through / across the wheat filed" , à travers = through / across

    but it can't be used talking about the rose bed

    yes indeed , "vers" is the equivalent of "in the direction of , toward"

    "elle promène vers le lit de roses":cross: "elle se promène autour du lit de roses":tick:
    "elle promène sur le lit de roses":cross: "elle se promène sur le lit de roses":cross: => "elle marche sur le lit de roses" :tick:
    why ? because "se promener sur " sounds weird when you are talking about a physical thing ,by cons you can say "elle se promène sur Pondichéry" or "elle se promène sur Paris".

    if you want to be the closest as possible using "sur" you should use "marcher sur" => "walking on"

    to summarize , you can say "se promener sur" only if you are talking about a town / a place / a street...etc

    EDIT : moustic, nonchalamment is rarely used nowadays (i am talking about every days life) , people would think that you're a poet if you say it to them

    i am not used to use it neither , so i can't say with certitude that your sentence sounds good
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2013
  8. moustic Senior Member

    near Limoges
    British English
    I agree "nonchalamment" isn't a word I would use in everyday language, but Nkos is translating a literary work dating back to 1945 so I don't think it would be out of place.

    PS - "a rose bed" is a "parterre" where roses grow (not a "lit").
     
  9. NKOS

    NKOS Junior Member

    Mumbai, India
    English & Hindi
    Thanks friends. That was quite an eye-opener.
     

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