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ward off evil spirits

Discussion in 'English Only' started by quietdandelion, Sep 6, 2007.

  1. quietdandelion

    quietdandelion Banned

    Homesweethome
    Formosa/Chinese
    Being superstitious, Kate brings a charm with her wherever she goes to ward off evil spirits.





    For a start, could I use "spell" to replace "charm" without changing its meaning.
    Second, does "ward off" mean "avoid passively" or "resist actively?" Thanks.
     
  2. David Senior Member

    ward off means protect oneself from, place obstacles in the path of

    a charm I think might be a spell and also might be a physical object, whereas a spell would be only something one said or wrote or the effect of some charm...

    In the stories, the cross held aloft is a charm to ward off vampires, whereas "her beauty cast a spell on me."
     
  3. quietdandelion

    quietdandelion Banned

    Homesweethome
    Formosa/Chinese
    Thanks, David.
     
  4. David Senior Member

    Bu kechi, bu kechi.
     
  5. quietdandelion

    quietdandelion Banned

    Homesweethome
    Formosa/Chinese
    Your Chinese amazes me!
    Ni how ou li mo!
     
  6. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    Can a charm be a spoken spell? I've only known it as an object of some kind.
     
  7. GreenWhiteBlue

    GreenWhiteBlue Senior Member

    New York
    USA - English
    A "charm" would work better than "spell". A "spell" is words, usually said aloud (a cognate, by the way, is the word "Gospel"; = god spel, or good news in modern English.) A charm, though, can be an object such as an amulet, and it makes more sense when used with "bring".
     

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