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Watashi-ha hijouni subarashii koto wo kangaeru

Discussion in '日本語 (Japanese)' started by lordxidar, Jan 12, 2007.

  1. lordxidar New Member

    English USA
    I have been trying to learn Japanese for a week now, through a female friend of mine who is in Japanese IV. Today she said something to me that was much too complex. I asked her for the translation and she just brushed it off. So I asked her to write it down for me, and she wrote this:

    " Watashi-ha hijouni subarashii koto wo kangaeru"

    To be honest, I can't make heads or tails of this. So I was wondering if someone wouldn't mind perhaps helping me out a little bit.
     
  2. Captain Haddock Senior Member

    日本 名古屋
    Canada, English
    The sentence by itself doesn't totally make sense to me without some contest. She might have been saying "you'll think I'm totally wonderful"!

    She might have wanted to say "I think that's totally wonderful" but got the verb form wrong.
     
  3. lordxidar New Member

    English USA
    Weird....Domo arigato gozaimasu.
     
  4. cheshire

    cheshire Senior Member

    اليابان
    Catholic (Cat-holic, not Catholic)
    Does "brushed it off" here mean "rejected"? Or does it have other meaning?

    I (usually) think about something really great.
    I'm thinking about...

    Either of these translations, I think.
     
  5. lordxidar New Member

    English USA
    By 'Brushed it off' I mean that she refused by changing the subject.

    I shall try and get her to tell me what she meant.

    Domo arigato gozaimasu.
     
  6. cheshire

    cheshire Senior Member

    اليابان
    Catholic (Cat-holic, not Catholic)
    Thanks for the answer.
    Maybe she was planing a surprise party. (This from the movie "Shall We Dance" that I saw yesterday,)
     
  7. lordxidar New Member

    English USA
    What makes you say "surprise party"?...Because it is possible; my birthday was last Tuesday.
     
  8. cheshire

    cheshire Senior Member

    اليابان
    Catholic (Cat-holic, not Catholic)
    It is just my joke, never mind. 日本語の勉強がんばってください。
     
  9. Captain Haddock Senior Member

    日本 名古屋
    Canada, English
    If your translation is correct, she probably should have said: "subarashii koto-nitsuite kangaete-iru", right?
     
  10. lordxidar New Member

    English USA
    I asked her what it means and she said that she'd tell me in a simpler way, and said

    "Anata wa yesashi desu"

    I can't find a translation for yesashi....But from what I've been taught the rest means "You are", I think....
     
  11. Flaminius

    Flaminius coclea mod

    capita Iaponiae
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    I suspect your friend meant yasashii (easy, sweet, tender etc.).
    Anata-wa yasashii desu
    This means, "You are sweet."

    In view of this, the longer original must have been intended to the effect that you are a great person.
     
  12. lordxidar New Member

    English USA
    I see. That makes it incredibly awkward....Never the less, I believe thanks are in order.

    Domo arigato gozaimasu.
     
  13. gibson55 New Member

    Latin America
    japanese
    Hi everyone, here are my guess...

    Probablly she wanted to say something like "I think (what you just said) is really great", but by telling it in Japanese she omitted the () part.

    (If that's the case, the phrase should have been "Watashi-ha hijouni subarashii koto to kangaeru" instead of wo)

    Maybe you had told her something nice and she really liked it, hence the comment. Then, when you asked her again she changed it to "You're a nice guy (to say such a nice thing)."

    I don't know if it fits to your particular situation, as I said I'm just guessing a cute couple doing sweet talk...lol.
     
  14. youtin

    youtin Senior Member

    Filipino, Philippines
    Here's my take on it, to add to the fun: :D

    "I'm thinking of a VERY wonderful thing"

    hijouni means "very", but other more simple words like "totemo" could have been used.

    However, if she said that what she wanted to say was something along "Anata wa yasashii desu," I think she made a mistake with the first thing she said ^^;

    To have the effect of "I think you're very wonderful/great", she could've said :

    (Watashi wa) anata no koto ga totemo subarashii to omoimasu.
    or even more simply :
    Anata wa totemo subarashii to omoimasu.

    Although if it was me I'd prefer saying "Anata wa totemo ii hito da to omoimasu" (I think you're a very good person)

    The verbs "kangaeru" and "omou" both mean "to think" BUT they are NOT used in the same way, so be careful!!
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think using to with kangaeru is not grammatically correct. wo is the right choice. to is used if it's with omou.
     
  15. Flaminius

    Flaminius coclea mod

    capita Iaponiae
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Welcome to the forums, youtin!

    Verbs kangaeru and omou can both be used with -to and -o. The former particle marks a subordinate clause (a sentence that is an object of the verb) and the latter direct object noun.
     
  16. Ponyfer New Member

    Mexican Spanish
    This is my traslation- Watashi-wa hijouni subarashii koto wo kangaeru "I'll think about something really great " But if you use (to) means "I think that, is really great" maybe something that you could have said.
     

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