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Water

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by blue_jewel, May 20, 2008.

  1. blue_jewel

    blue_jewel Senior Member

    Philippines
    Filipino/Tagalog
    Guys, how do you say 'water' in your language?

    In Tagalog, it's 'tubig' sounds like 'too big' ;)
     
  2. Roviana:

    kolo
     
  3. Tamar

    Tamar Senior Member

    Israel, Hebrew
    Hebrew:
    מים ma'im
     
  4. Manx:

    ushtey


    Cornish:

    dowr
     
  5. bb3ca201 Senior Member

    Toronto sa Chanada
    English/Scottish Gaelic, Canada
    in Gaelic, we say "uisge" (pronounced "OOSH - kyuh")
     
  6. In Irish Gaelic we have it similar: uisce;) (pronounced: Eesh-ke)
     
  7. bb3ca201 Senior Member

    Toronto sa Chanada
    English/Scottish Gaelic, Canada
    Yes, that's true -- they're sister languages. Perhaps dialects might have something to do with difference in pronounciation, but the written word is similar.
     
  8. Frank06

    Frank06 Senior Member

    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,

    In Dutch:water

    Groetjes,

    Frank

    PS: this might be interesting.
     
  9. Chechen/Ingush:

    хи(й)
     
  10. Tamar

    Tamar Senior Member

    Israel, Hebrew
    How is it pronounced?
     
  11. valdo Senior Member

    Riga, Latvia
    Latvia, Latvian
    In Latvian;

    ūdens
     
  12. Benzene

    Benzene Senior Member

    GENOA (ITALY)
    Italian, Italy
    Hi!

    In Italian:

    "acqua" noun,singular,feminine (àc-qua);

    "acque" noun, plural, feminine (àc-que).

    Bye,

    Benzene
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2008
  13. PALOMA BB Senior Member

    Canarias
    ESPAÑA
    Agua in Spanish
    Regards
     
  14. blue_jewel

    blue_jewel Senior Member

    Philippines
    Filipino/Tagalog

    Thank you Benzene, but I can't understand why there are two translations of water in Italian :confused: What's that feminine singular and plural forms for?

    :)
     
  15. Benzene

    Benzene Senior Member

    GENOA (ITALY)
    Italian, Italy
    Hi blue_jewel!

    Singular and plural numbers exist In Italian since the root is Latin.

    Bye,

    Benzene
     
  16. Kangy Senior Member

    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Argentina [Spanish]
    ^ Same in Spanish:

    You can say el agua (singular) or las aguas (plural).
    The plural form sounds a bit more poetic or elevated, and it usually refers to the water of a sea, a lake or something of the sort.
     
  17. as khee(y) (short ee and slight y at the end)
     
  18. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    I have heard that uisge is the origin of English "whiskey". What language is "Moshka Woda"?

    "Water" in French: eau (plural eaux).
    German: Wasser.
    Modern Greek: neró (sorry I don't have Greek letters, but nu, epsilon, rho, omicron with an accent mark).
    Ancient Greek: hydor (combining from hydro).

    Curiously, Spanish and English babytalk both have "wah-wah" (spelled guagua in Spanish).
     
  19. That is true. Whiskey is literally called "fire water" in Gaelic.


    Karachaevo-Balkar:

    suu


    Ossetic:

    don
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2008
  20. Albanian:

    ujë
     
  21. bb3ca201 Senior Member

    Toronto sa Chanada
    English/Scottish Gaelic, Canada
    You're right. The full origin of the word "whisky" (Scottish spelling; the Irish spell it "whiskey") is the Gaelic phrase "uisge-beatha", which means "water of life". Curiously, that's how we still refer to whisky in Gaelic. We can ask "A bheil thu ag òl uisge-beatha?" (Are you drinking whisky?).

    And (I think; anybody who speaks Greek can correct me) the way to spell water in Greek is νερό.
     
  22. kusurija

    kusurija Senior Member

    Lithuania, K. city
    Lithuania Czech
    Czech:
    voda
    Lithuanian:
    vanduo (GEN.:vandens..cf with Latvian)
    Latin:
    aqua
    Japanese:
    [mizu](sorry, I can't write characters in this moment)
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2008
  23. avok

    avok Senior Member

    Turkish:

    Su
     
  24. franz rod Senior Member

    Italiano
    Hittite:
    Watar
     
  25. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    Olde Englisc: wæter

     
  26. Nizo Senior Member

    The Esperanto word is akvo, clearly from the Latin root.
     
  27. olivinha Senior Member

    Los Madriles
    Português, Brasil
    Água (and águas in its plural form) in Portuguese:
    a água
    as águas
     
  28. mataripis

    mataripis Senior Member

    De pa Dumaget: E Orat
     
  29. apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    In Greek the water is «ὕδωρ» ('hūdōr, n., 'iðor, n. in modern pronunciation). The name «νερό» (ne'ro, n.) is the colloquial name, deriving from the Byzantine expression «νεαρὸν ὕδωρ» (nea'ron 'hydor)--> fresh water; in time the adj. «νεαρὸν» prevailed over the noun and replaced it: «Νεαρὸν»>«νερὸν»>«νερό».
    Its formal name stubbornly remains «ύδωρ» - e.g. «Eταιρεία Yδάτων» (ete'ria i'ðaton)--> Water Company - especially in compounds. PIE base *wodor/*wedor/*uder-, water.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2011
  30. Perseas Senior Member

    Athen
    Griechisch
    In Greek, there is, also, the root "-αχ" (-ach) --- obviously related to the latin "aqua" --- and is found in names of people, rivers.

    Αχέρων : Acheron (river name)
    Αχελλώος : Achelous (river name)
    Αχιλλέας : Achilles (the hero of the Trojan war)
    Αχαιός : Achaean (member of one of the major Greek tribes / resident of Achaia)
    Ίναχος : Inachus (river name )
     
  31. apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    That's the Mycenaean «ἄχα» (*axa) found only in neuter plural and means "waters", PIE base *akwa-, water.
    [off-topic]However Perseas, I'm not so sure the name Achilles shares the same etymon with Achellous or Achaean. The prevailing views for it are two:
    a) It derives from the neuter noun «ἄχος» (āxŏs)--> pain, distress (PIE base *ag-es-, fault, guilt, cognate to English ache), therefore Achilles is the one who causes pain, or
    b) it derives from the adjective «ἄχειλος» ('ăxeilŏs, m.), in Aeolic «ἄχελλος» ('ăxĕllŏs, m.); privative prefix «α-» + «χεῖλος» ('xeilŏs, n.) or «χέλλος» ('xĕllŏs, n.)--> lip. As you might remember, Achilles' mother Thetis, accidentally burned off his lips ;) [/off-topic]
     
  32. sakvaka

    sakvaka Moderoitsija

    Finnish: vesi (veden, vettä)
     
  33. Favara Senior Member

    Catalan - Southern Val.
    In Catalan it's aigua, but in some areas we also say ma (apparently related to Arabic) when talking to small children.
     
  34. francisgranada Senior Member

    Slovakia
    Hungarian
    Hungarian:

    víz

    (derived words: vizel, vedel)
     
  35. إسكندراني

    إسكندراني Senior Member

    أرض الأنجل
    عربي (مصر)ـ | en (gb)
    Arabic
    Formal: ماء maa2
    Dialects: ماي، ماية، موي، موية maay, maaya, mooy, mooya
     
  36. AutumnOwl

    AutumnOwl Senior Member

    Sweden
    Swedish - Sweden, Finnish
    Swedish:
    Vatten
     
  37. origumi Senior Member

    Hebrew
    Hebrew and Aramaic are similar to Arabic in regard to water:

    Hebrew - mayim
    Aramaic - mayya
     
  38. Gavril Senior Member

    English, USA
    Also Akkadian (a plural form like Heb. mayim).
     
  39. إسكندراني

    إسكندراني Senior Member

    أرض الأنجل
    عربي (مصر)ـ | en (gb)
    Apparently Catalan too :)
    In Egypt we pronounce it exactly like mayya
     
  40. darush Senior Member

    in Persian: آب /aab/
     
  41. rusita preciosa

    rusita preciosa Modus forendi

    USA (Φιλαδέλφεια)
    Russian (Moscow)
    Russian:
    вода /vodá / (sing.)
    воды /vódy/ (plur.)
     
  42. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    Norwegian:

    vann

     
  43. kloie Senior Member

    houston tx
    american english from texas
    estonian=vesi
    serbian=вода
    german=wasser
     
  44. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    Here you can check the water in at least 100 languages :rolleyes:
     
  45. mataripis

    mataripis Senior Member

    the ancient word for water in South east asia ; " e Orat " (the water).This is Dumaget word where Tagalog" Ilat "(spring)originated.
     

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