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  1. lacanadagurl Junior Member

    Chinese/English, USA
    Comment dit-on "we will miss you" en francais? Vous nous manquerez?? you will be missed by us?

    Moderator note: several threads on the same phrase were merged.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2010
  2. birdyumi

    birdyumi Senior Member

    French
    yup, that's right!
     
  3. Nicomon

    Nicomon Senior Member

    Montréal
    Français, Québec ♀
    :thumbsup: « Vous nous manquerez » is correct.

    Edit : oops... our posts crossed.
     
  4. Micia93

    Micia93 Senior Member

    in the center of France
    FRANCE FRENCH

    could also be "tu nous manqueras" ;)
     
  5. canadarocks191 Junior Member

    Canada; English
    Salut.
    Comment on dit 'we will miss you' en français? Est-ce que c'est 'vous nous allez manquer' ou 'vous nous manquerez'? Merci en avance. Au fait, 'we will miss you' veut dire dans l'avenir en ce contexte.

    L.Z.
     
  6. honeybfly Senior Member

    Londres
    UK, English
    vous allez nous manquer/tu vas nous manquer
     
  7. canadarocks191 Junior Member

    Canada; English
    Merci beaucoup, Honeybfly!
     
  8. ascoltate

    ascoltate Senior Member

    Montréal, QC
    U.S.A. & Canada, English
    If you want to avoid the verb "manquer" (since it is confusing to conjugate sometimes), you can say : "On va s'ennuyer de toi/vous" (especially in Québec, where this is quite common to say)...
     
  9. canadarocks191 Junior Member

    Canada; English
    Okay, thanks Ascoltate. That sounds pretty good. Which one do you think is better if I'm writing to my French teacher (he's leaving D=)? I'm kind of leaning towards 'on va s'ennuyer de toi/vous'. But doesn't ennuyer mean to bother or to annoy, even to bore, someone? Wouldn't this make the sentence a bit informal?
    Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2008
  10. ascoltate

    ascoltate Senior Member

    Montréal, QC
    U.S.A. & Canada, English
    "s'ennuyer de" = "to miss" (in France too, although I think the expression's a little archaic- French people can give their input) - "s'ennuyer" without the "de" usually means "to get bored", yes.
    I don't think it sounds any more or less formal than "manquer"...
    But if it's a teacher, I'd probably use "vous"...
     
  11. canadarocks191 Junior Member

    Canada; English
    Thanks for confirming that and thank you for all your help. =]
    Merci beaucoup.
    L.Z.
     
  12. honeybfly Senior Member

    Londres
    UK, English
    I would say that manquer is used a lot more than s'ennuyer de, I have to say I have never heard s'ennuyer de used in this way.
     
  13. clopac Senior Member

    Boston
    French - France
    For me, a child can "s'ennuyer de" his mom (Tu t'ennuies de ta maman ?) but a student cannot "s'ennuyer de" son professeur.It would be too personal.
    So I would say "Vous allez nous manquer".
     
  14. canadarocks191 Junior Member

    Canada; English
    Thanks everyone for their feedback! Sadly, my professor just left today and I did use manquer to express the class's feelings (I felt that s'ennuyer de just couldn't work). Thank you for all your help. =]
     
  15. ascoltate

    ascoltate Senior Member

    Montréal, QC
    U.S.A. & Canada, English
    I take offense to that - "s'ennuyer de" works just fine -- you are in CANADA. And it is CANADIAN FRENCH -- do a Google for "On va s'ennuyer de vous" and you will find many, many sites, all in Canada. You shouldn't bow down to the France-French masses -- unless you "fancy" using a different variety of language than is appropriate for your location or audience.

    I'm exaggerating of course - "Vous allez nous manquer" works just fine anywhere - but to say that "s'ennuyer de" is innapropriate is, well, inappropriate.
     
  16. canadarocks191 Junior Member

    Canada; English
    I'm sorry, ascoltate. I did not mean to offend anyone. I meant that I was not sure to use it because it was a new concept to me. I apologize for my rudeness. Thank you for correcting me.
     
  17. Aoyama Senior Member

    川崎市、巴里 (黎)
    仏(佛)法語צרפתית Clodoaldien
    "On vous regrettera" may also work, depending on context.
    For the debate about "s'ennuyer de" and " manquer à qqn", puting Canadian French and "French" French aside :
     
  18. canadarocks191 Junior Member

    Canada; English
    Merci Aoyama.
    So, 's'ennuyer de' would be used in a more personal sense, while 'on vous regrettera' and 'manquer à qqn' would be more formal? Thank you for your response.
     
  19. Machiavelo New Member

    Ottawa, Canada
    Quebec French
    In Quebec ... in the Gatineau region anyways ... we usually say "tu me manques." when saying "I miss you" and "tu me manqueras" when saying "I will miss you."
     
  20. Aoyama Senior Member

    川崎市、巴里 (黎)
    仏(佛)法語צרפתית Clodoaldien
    Which is exactly what we say in France also.
    There is another way to say this, but in a somewhat stronger meaning :
    "je me languis de vous" (=+- I am longing for you, I am missing you [a lot]).
    In the South of France (for some unknown reason) the meaning is not as strong.
    "Je me languis de" is often used as "I am missing xx".
    "je me languirai de vous" could be possible, but probably not "nous nous languirons de vous".
     
  21. Albert 50 Senior Member

    Montreal QC and Dallas TX
    Canada: French and English (bilingual)
    Hello to all

    I'm not Québécois though I have lived a good part of my adult life in Québec. I was raised in a part of Manitoba (Western Canada) in which French is spoken. There, we use both "tu me manques" and "Je m'ennuie de toi" for "I miss you" (use them indiscriminately, 50-50). In that context, both are equally appropriate.

    Having spoken both French and English all of my life (though French was more dominant in my childhood) one of the few areas in which I still "stumble" is in the proper use of the verb "to miss" in English (and sometimes the use of "manquer" in French) beause of the confusing, opposite word order (Do you translate "tu me manques" into English by "I miss you" or "You miss me"?) I know the answer, of course, and in writing use them correctly in both languages but in rapid speech I still have to slow down and think it through. (Makes me feel inferior but...) Consequently, I do tend to use "Je m'ennuie de toi" to avoid the mental acrobatics...

    This is, I realize, a Canadian reaction and most Europeans would not identify with it since they are (usually) raised in a non-bilingual environment.

    Cordialement
    Albert
     
  22. Mikamocha Senior Member

    English-US
    To add a new dimension to this interesting thread, which is more appropriate to use when saying "we will miss you" tu vas nous manquer" or "tu nous manqueras". I see both in the preceding posts.

    To me I would you the future proche as I would miss someone that I cared about as soon as they were gone...any feedback on this?
     
  23. Micia93

    Micia93 Senior Member

    in the center of France
    FRANCE FRENCH
    "tu vas nous manquer" is more natural

    :=)
     
  24. doinel

    doinel Modlife crisis

    Southern France
    France French
    Nous allons vous regretter peut se dire à un professeur qui va partir. Cela peut impliquer que le remplaçant ne sera pas à la hauteur mais comme ce verbe fonctionne comme 'miss' il est d'un usage plus facile.
     
  25. Micia93

    Micia93 Senior Member

    in the center of France
    FRANCE FRENCH
    sais-tu si l'anglais propose aussi une expression pour "nous allons vous regretter" ou est-ce que "I will miss you" exprime les deux nuances "regretter" et "manquer" ?
     
  26. Mikamocha Senior Member

    English-US
    Je pense que "things won't be the same without you" exprime la nuance de "regretter". Je n'arrive pas à trouver une autre tournure qui se rapport à "regretter."

    Merci pour ton explication.

    Mika.
     
  27. Micia93

    Micia93 Senior Member

    in the center of France
    FRANCE FRENCH
    maybe : "we will regret you" ?
     
  28. Aoyama Senior Member

    川崎市、巴里 (黎)
    仏(佛)法語צרפתית Clodoaldien
    true, as probably "we are going to miss you" would be in English.
    very true also, but I don't think that here "we will regret you" could work in English. It might work if the person had died ...
     
  29. Mikamocha Senior Member

    English-US
    No..that doesn't work in English. You could say "We will regret your absence" but that does not sound very natural to me. I can see why "regretter" is just translated as "to miss someone." There doesn't seem to be a direct relationship to an English term, at least not that I can think of.

    You could also say that "we will regret your absence" but again, that is not very fluid.

    D'autres pensées ?
     
  30. Nicomon

    Nicomon Senior Member

    Montréal
    Français, Québec ♀
    Bonjour,

    Ce vieux fil vient de resurgir, et je suis étonnée moi-même de ne pas avoir précisé que le futur proche « tu vas/vous allez nous manquer » me viendrait en effet plus spontanément que le futur simple.

    Dans le contexte précis d'un professeur qui quitte son poste, je ne serais pas portée à dire « nous allons / on va s'ennuyer de vous ». Je le dirais éventuellement en cas d'absence temporaire (par ex. s'il part en congé maladie ou pour des vacances de quelques semaines) et seulement si la relation prof/élève est très amicale.

    J'aime bien la solution de doinel : nous allons vous regretter... et j'aime aussi l'adaptation de Mikamocha : things won't be the same without you,
    qui à mon avis pourrait se traduire à peu près littéralement par : ce ne sera pas pareil, sans vous.

    Je me demande si "you will be (deeply) missed" ne rendrait pas cette nuance de « regretter » un peu mieux que "we will miss you"?
    Ou est-ce blanc bonnet/bonnet blanc? Qu'en pensent les anglophones?

    Par contre, je traduirais définitivement I (will) miss you par je m'ennuie de toi / je vais m'ennuyer de toi dans un contexte plus personnel. Au Québec, un enfant peut s'ennuyer de ses parents, comme une mère peut s'ennuyer de son fils, une jeune fille de son « chum » (copain), une femme de son mari, etc.

    Je vous laisse sur ces paroles de Vigneault :
    Dans ce contexte, s'ennuyer peut à mon avis avoir deux sens. ;)
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2010
  31. Aoyama Senior Member

    川崎市、巴里 (黎)
    仏(佛)法語צרפתית Clodoaldien
    oui, bien d'accord, ce qui se rendrait aussi par "sans vous, ce ne sera pas la même chose".
    Pour "s'ennuyer de ", l'expression, bien que possible, est plus rare en français hexagonal. "Je m'ennuie de toi" pour "tu me manques" me semble bizarre, mais ça se discute.
     
  32. Micia93

    Micia93 Senior Member

    in the center of France
    FRANCE FRENCH
    oui, ça dépend des personnes en effet, car "je m'ennuie de toi" ne me choque pas du tout, je trouve ça même assez mignon

    :=)
     
  33. Aoyama Senior Member

    川崎市、巴里 (黎)
    仏(佛)法語צרפתית Clodoaldien
    Je pense, comme déjà dit plus haut, qu'on aurait plutôt "je me languis de toi", moins "mignon" mais plus courant.
     
  34. Micia93

    Micia93 Senior Member

    in the center of France
    FRANCE FRENCH
    "je me languis de toi" est beaucoup trop formel, je trouve et très 18è siècle ...
     
  35. Aoyama Senior Member

    川崎市、巴里 (黎)
    仏(佛)法語צרפתית Clodoaldien
    Oui, mais pas dans le sud de la France ni chez les Pieds-Noirs.
     
  36. Micia93

    Micia93 Senior Member

    in the center of France
    FRANCE FRENCH
    ha, je ne savais pas Aoyama !
     
  37. Nicomon

    Nicomon Senior Member

    Montréal
    Français, Québec ♀
    Or dans mon cas, c'est « tu me manques » qui me semble froid/impersonnel.

    À ma connaissance, je me languis - que je savais courant dans le sud de la France - ne se dit pas au Québec.
    Je connais seulement l'expression cesse de me faire languir!

    Extrait d'Antidote (bon d'accord, le logiciel a été conçu par une société québécoise) :
     
  38. Aoyama Senior Member

    川崎市、巴里 (黎)
    仏(佛)法語צרפתית Clodoaldien
    question de ... rivages. "Tu me manques" me semble très expressif.
    Pour "se languir de qqn", le terme semble vieilli mais encore une fois, il est très courant en Provence et en Afrique du Nord.
    peut être pris dans deux sens : cesse de me faire attendre ou arrête de me rendre malheureux en ne répondant pas à mes avances (amoureuses) ...

    Pour en revenir à "tu me manques", c'est tellement courant qu'il y a une rubrique pour ça dans les cartes de vœux (en France) :
    http://www.cybercartes.com/cartes/tu-me-manques
    qu'est-ce qu'on trouverait au Québec ?

    Ceci dit, pour "we will miss you", on pourrait aussi avoir "on pensera à vous".
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2010

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