wear cologne/perfume

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by dathrilla, Apr 23, 2006.

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  1. dathrilla Senior Member

    American English, New York
    Hi,

    Do we use the equivalent translation of "wear" while designating perfume?
    Or do we simply say "mettre"?
     
  2. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
    We very commonly say : porter un parfum.

    - Moi je ne porte que Fleur de Poubelle, de chez Détritus. Je l'adore !
    - Ma femme porte un parfum différent tous les jours, pour éviter la routine.

    Etc.
     
  3. dathrilla Senior Member

    American English, New York
    so would it work if we asked: " qu'est-ce que tu portes aujourd'hui?"
     
  4. LV4-26

    LV4-26 Senior Member

    That's right.
    What do I wear in bed? Why, Chanel No.5, of course
    Ce que je porte la nuit ? Mais, Chanel n°5, bien sûr
    (Marilyn Monroe) :)

    NB : Chanel doesn't pay me a penny for that ;)
     
  5. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    "Elle ne porte rien d'autre qu'un peu d'essence de Guerlain dans les cheveux...":) (initials BB - Gainsbourg)
     
  6. geve

    geve Senior Member

    France, Paris
    France, French
    As for "mettre du parfum" it is only punctual, it describes the moment when you put (is that how you would say in English?) the perfume
    eg: Le matin, la première chose que je mets, c'est mon parfum
     
  7. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Put the perfume on.:)
     
  8. geve

    geve Senior Member

    France, Paris
    France, French
    Thanks, I knew I should have put a "on" somewhere!
     
  9. anangelaway

    anangelaway Senior Member

    Toulouse
    French
    Ha Geve-Geve! C'est vrai?:)
    Oui, moi aussi je me parfume, mais après m'être lavée et brossée les dents. :D

    En réalité j'ai un doute, car j'ai toujours compris qu'en anglais : on met/porte du/un parfum, on ne se parfume pas. C'est vrai?
    On français, on met du parfum sur soi (on porte tel parfum), et on se parfume aussi, non?
     
  10. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Yes, people do not "perfume themselves" in English. Nor do they "get perfumed" (the other common translation of a French reflexive verb). Not in polite society, anyway;)
     
  11. anangelaway

    anangelaway Senior Member

    Toulouse
    French
    Merci Tim. Donc plus de doute. :)
     
  12. geve

    geve Senior Member

    France, Paris
    France, French
    About "mettre" and "parfum", I forgot to mention "mettre au parfum" which is colloquial for renseigner/informer/rencarder...
    Ce qui n'empêche que le parfum est la première chose que tu mets ! ;)
    Mais non, ce n'était pas vrai, je ne suis pas Marilyn, même si la ressemblance est criante :rolleyes:
    (si tu veux tout savoir, c'est les chaussettes que je mets en premier :D )
    Can we get perfumed if we're unrefined, then?
     
  13. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Sugar, you can do whatever you like;)

    No - not really, it was just a joke.:eek:
     
  14. geve

    geve Senior Member

    France, Paris
    France, French
    Well, I wanted to make sure I wasn't missing an idiom for unmannered people here, but that's all right, I can take jokes! (ainsi que les petits noms sucrés, of course)

    So then, I'll go get the perfume I usually wear, and I'll put it on.
     
  15. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    That's alright, I understand. I often think the same thing where I see French people joking and I don't get it or I think I get it but it just seems really unfunny whereas everyone else thinks it's hilarious etc:)
     
  16. CARNESECCHI Senior Member

    Auvergne
    French / France
    Hello,
    Il y en a (que je ne nommerai pas) qui (attention cliché!) s'aspergent de parfum à bon marché!
     
  17. LV4-26

    LV4-26 Senior Member

    Ce doit être ça qu'on appelle la douche française ;)
     
  18. geve

    geve Senior Member

    France, Paris
    France, French
    Eh bien, je suis ravie d'apprendre que nos voisins européens rendent hommage à nos secrets de beauté nationaux ! :eek: (on savait déjà que le concept de la douche n'était pas très répandu dans la culture française...)


    Tim, I think you could also put the blame on the weird sense of humor of some French people here :rolleyes: (I won't give any name either, I'd rather remain anonymous)
     
  19. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    I once upset a Frenchman (an ex-boyfriend of my boyfriend!:D) by saying he had had a French wash. And it was bloody true. We stayed with him for a week and every day after we'd had a shower he was sitting there by the door with his anarok on ready to go out. One day I was in a hurry and said I was going to have a French wash that day - and he didn't speak to me again for the rest of the time we were there!:D:D
     
  20. geve

    geve Senior Member

    France, Paris
    France, French
    Perhaps the French have poor hygiene, the most famous kiss is the French one nonetheless! Et toc ! :p

    Seriously, and to remain on the perfume topic, why the "French wash"? I wasn't able to find anything about it... (except a list of derogatory expressions with the word "French" in it) Does it mean that in other countries, people didn't bother putting on perfume even when the bath was a monthly chore (at most)?
     
  21. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    I don't know Geve, but (choosing his words very carefully...) I can confirm that in the UK, at least, the French have a certain reputation, hmmm, for being ecologically sensitive about not wasting any more water than can be humanly avoided.

    How's that for diplomacy...Just reporting the case not saying I think it!!

    I think if you said "I'm having a French wash" to an English person they would know/guess what you meant, but not if you inserted "German" or "Spanish", say, into that sentence.
     
  22. JazzByChas

    JazzByChas Senior Member

    Well, well...

    As for being perfumed, I don't hear many people being subjected to that, but rather things. It would be a bit unusual to have a person be "perfumed." (Except, perhaps, when you are walking through a department store, and some overzealous perfume salesperson sprays you unawares, and you have just been "perfumed!"):D

    Now, I have heard rumors about the french and their hygiene, i.e. they invented perfume so that when those loathed bathings had occured a while ago, they could cover up the natural musk that has built up.

    In English, one puts perfume on, then one is wearing perfume. So normally, one asks, "What perfume are you wearing?" So, as Gève has suggested, se mettre du parfum occurs at the moment you put it on, after that, "on porte du parfum."

    So here's to pleasant fragrances and memorable encounters!
     
  23. anangelaway

    anangelaway Senior Member

    Toulouse
    French
    That's correct. :) And those rumors you heard have travelled all the way down to here, probably from up north, then before that from UK...:D Not even I think it is only just rumours, in my experience, it became some sort of legend, something to tell your grand children : why did the French invented ''le Parfum''? Well, let me tell you my child... (a tale)

    But what if they didn't invent it? :D

    Well next time, I would use the Tim's politically correct answer, and make sure it is understood how much the French are environmentally friendly creatures: hummm, yes, that will have a great impact. :D


    However, it seems that if you don't wear perfume nowadays, automatically you stinks, no matter where you are from, or how many shower you already had in a day. :confused:

    I have another suggestion dathrilla :

    ''Quel parfum portes-tu?'' ''Quel parfum tu as mis(aujourd'hui)?''
    ''Hummm, tu sens bon ! C'est quoi/lequel? (Tu as mis quoi?)
    In that last one, do not mention 'aujourd'hui', the person may feel offended.
     
  24. Jim69 Senior Member

    Lyon, France
    French
    :eek: Ai-je pris ma douche annuelle ?
    J'ai un doute tout d'un coup !!! :rolleyes:

    tsss, incroyable que persiste cette légende... :D
     
  25. CARNESECCHI Senior Member

    Auvergne
    French / France
  26. Jim69 Senior Member

    Lyon, France
    French
    Depuis le 17 ème siècle, on a évolué :cool:
    On a maintenant l'eau courante dans les cuisines, ne désespérons pas les salles de bain apparaîtrons en France sous peu (d'ici une 100aine d'années :D)
     
  27. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
    Bien !

    Je revêts donc mon uniforme de modo pour proclamer que, la question de départ (vous en souvenez-vous, de la question de départ, mmh ?) ayant reçu une réponse appropriée, et le fil déviant vers un papoti-papota sur les tenants et aboutissants des clichés-qui-ont-la-vie-dure-sur-les-Français-pas-propres-cracras (dirigez-vous vers ce fil si vous désirez en rajouter une couche), je ferme cette discussion.
     
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