What grade are you in?

Discussion in 'Deutsch (German)' started by gaer, Mar 18, 2005.

  1. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    Who,

    I wanted to mention to you something about our system, and I started a new thread because there has been some confusion.

    All kids who turn 7 years old either DURING the school year or during the SUMMER after the school year but before the next school year MAY start 1st grade.

    But since some kids who are born in June, July or August are small or are not ready for 1st grade, they are not forced to start and may wait an extra year to begin 1st grade. Therefore, by knowing the age and the birthday of a student, I know that adding 6 to the age that someone will turn BEFORE September first will usually give me the correct grade. I also know that sometimes I have to add 7 for those born in the summer, because often they start a year late.

    We have kindergarten and preschool in the US, but those years of school do not have numbers. Regardless of where you go to school in the US, there are 12 years of primary and secondary school.

    I know this sounds confusing. But to apply it to you, because your birthday is in the summer, you would probably be in the 10th grade here (6+10=16), the age you will be before the next school year begins. If you were small when you were ready to start school, your parents might have delayed your start a year, to give you a better chance of fitting in socially. If you did not start school late, I would guess you to be in 10th grade, but that is using our system. To this moment, I don't know what "year" you are in, according to the German system.

    In addition, based on your level of accomplishment in language, I kept thinking you were a year ahead. I don't know why I said that you would be in 11th grade here. That was stupid. If you can tell me how old you were when you started your first year in primary school, I can tell you what grade you would now be in here, in the US. :)
     
  2. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Well, that's a really good explanation and now I've understood the American school system almost completely.

    First, I want to mention how is the system in Germany, i.e. in Brandenburg: We also have kindergarten and preschool, but we only sum them up to 'Kindergarten'. Regularly, in the age of 6, you have to start going to school, but if you're born in the summer as I am, you had to wait a year. That is, I firstly went to school when I was 7, but my brother who is born in February and my sister who is born in March were 6 when they started.
    Then, you have many opportunities what way you want to go. Either 6 years in elemantary and then you gotta decide where to go on, or 5 years elementary, and if so, you can go to a school offering 'Schnellläuferklassen'. You will go on at a High School, Junior High School, or Comprehensive School. I chose the first way. At the High School, you should do 7 years till 13th grade, the examination grade :) , but also only 4 years till 10th grade, the grade of quizzes, to get the GCSE, I think. At the other above-mentioned schools, you have to do 4 years.

    Second, all in all in Germany, we have to go for at least 10 years to school, I want to go for 13, in order to go to a university and study some languages.

    I hope, it helps a while, but I thank you for opening this thread.
     
  3. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    I made a couple suggestions, Who. I would recommend to you that you not use "gonna" when writing unless you are clearly writing entirely in a playful, "slangy" sort of manner. If you want to check my view about this, you could check in English, but I believe most people (of all ages) will agree with me.

    Words such as junior high, high school, are never capitalized unless you are referring to a specific school, for instance: Fort Lauderdale High School.

    Your system is very similar to ours about starting school, except that starting later is a choice here, not a rule, if you are born in the summer. I recommend to parents NOT to start their children in 1st grade when they have summer birthdays unless they are above average in size and social development.

    In the area of Germany in which my student-friend lives, the choice of what "course" to follow is made by the end of 4th grade. So obviously the rules are very different, at least in this way. :)

    Gaer
     
  4. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    I understand your corrections and appreciate them, but why didn't you correct Comprehensive School to comprehensive school? I didn't refer to any specific school either.
     
  5. Lora Senior Member

    England
    UK, English
    Now...do I fancy trying to explain the English system? I'm sure someone could do it better than I can.
     
  6. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Yes, do it. I always needed it. If this thread is complete, we can move it to "Culteral Issues" to get more posts.
     
  7. Lora Senior Member

    England
    UK, English
    Right ok then, here goes nothing - and I apologise in advance if I confuse people even more.

    Schooling in England is compulsory from the age of 5. The academic year starts in September and anyone who is 5 from September of that year onwards (before September of the next year) starts school that year.
    The main system is that you start at first school/primary school and then go on to High school, but where I live it's slightly different:
    The first year of first/primary school is called reception. After reception your school life progresses in years - from Year 1, all the way up to Year 11, when you are 16 and can leave school.
    Primary school is Year 1 - Year 6 I believe, and then High school is Year 7 - Year 11. Some high schools have what are known as 'Sixth Forms' attached to them - 'Sixth Form' is Years 12 and 13 - Year 12 is 'lower sixth' and Year 13 is 'upper sixth'
    These 2 years of schooling are not compulsory.
    Examinations go as follows - there are examinations called SATs (which in terms of qualifications don't really mean very much), but these are done in Year 3, Year 6 and Year 9 (I think)
    From Year 10 you choose the subjects you will take GCSE examinations in - obivously subjects like English, Maths and Science are obligatory - in our school we also had to take a Technology exam, Religious Education, one language (the majority did French) and then we got 2 option subjects - in total I did 11 GCSE exams:
    English Language
    English Literature
    Maths
    Biology
    Physics
    Chemistry (some just do science as one subject, rather than 3 separate like I did)
    French
    RE
    Food Technology
    German (option subject)
    Art (option subject)

    After you've done your GCSEs you can leave school - or you can stay on at a sixth form, or go to a college, and do A levels (which are split into AS exams at the end of Year 12 and A2 exams at the end of Year 13) or AVCE qualifications - which are more vocational.
    After these two years you can apply to university to do all sorts of other qualifications - I can't say I know as much about those.

    Also, I think that the system is Scotland is different - they do Highers rather than GCSEs - but I really don't know much more about their school system.

    I hope that that isn't too confusing!
     
  8. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Very good, Lora. I appreciate it, and I'm sure Gaer will too. It's interesting to see differences and similarities. Thanks.
     
  9. Lora Senior Member

    England
    UK, English
    No problem - thanks for your explanations too :)
     
  10. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    We don't use the trem "comprehensive school", so I left it alone. I left it to you to decide how you wanted to handle i :)

    G
     
  11. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    I'm very interested. Lora, Let me see if I understand things.

    You must start at 5, but you do not have to "turn 5" until right before September. I'm imagining the cut-off date might be August 31st. This actually means that some people who start do not become 5 year old until the summer after the year. This is the same as in the US.

    The first year, which you call "reception", is not numbered. The age at which children attend this year of school corresponds to kindegarten here, which is not compulsory (but should be, I believe).

    Now, the SECOND year, as you are describing it, is number as year 1. This would correspond in age to our 1st grade, but if your info is accurate (and I assume it is), your children start school earlier. 1st grade here starts at age 7. But as in your system, you don't have to turn 7 until the following summer AFTER the grade, just before september.

    I'm staggered at the fact that children are started so young, although I started at age 5 and turned 6 in October, in 1st grade. There is a developmental problem for many children that age. I was having trouble reading (developmental immaturity), and my natural affinity for reading did not "kick in" until towards the end of the year, when I caught up and remained very advanced from then on.

    You can leave school at 16. But what age are students when they finish with high school if they are going to continue on a university level? Here students either are 18 when they start 12th grade or will become 18 before the next school year.

    Strange that your exams are also called SATs. But we only have them for high school, I believe, and they are taken in the last two years.

    Yes, it IS confusing, but not because of your explanation. I would love to get into a discussion of the sanity or insanity of school, as it is, but I would not do that unless others are interested. :)

    Gaer
     

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