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What is the genitive plural of "vestis"?

Discussion in 'Lingua Latina (Latin)' started by James Bates, Sep 18, 2012.

  1. James Bates Senior Member

    English America
    Wheelock's Latin says third declension masculine and feminine nouns with a nominative singular in -is or -es and having the same number of syllables in both the nominative and genitive (often called "parisyllabic") have a genitive plural in -ium. Can anybody tell me why "vestis" does not follow this rule?
     
  2. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    What have you seen as the genitive plural of vestis, and where did you see it?

    At least some ancient authors spell it 'vestium' as the rule would lead us to expect.

    Seneca, De Vita Beata [7.2] Vulgum autem tam chlamydatos quam coronatos voco: autem tam chlamydatos quam coronatos voco; non enim colorem vestium, quibus praetexta sunt corpora, aspicio.
     
  3. James Bates Senior Member

    English America
    en.wiktionary.org/wiki/vestis
     
  4. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    This seems to be a mistake.

    If you go to the linked Lewis & Short entry, you will see that there is no genitive plural among the citations. This is on the Perseus website. If you use the 'word study' tool on the right side, you will find no entries for vestum, but a search for vestium leads to a word analysis link that identifies vestium as a genitive plural.
     
  5. James Bates Senior Member

    English America

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