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What is the land around a (large) lake called?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by George French, Jul 6, 2011.

  1. George French Senior Member

    English - UK
    What is the land around a (large) lake called?

    GF..

    I have not given my attempt on purpose, yet. I do not want to influence you posters out there.....
     
  2. pops91710

    pops91710 Senior Member

    Umm, land? Lakeland?
     
  3. Hau Ruck

    Hau Ruck Senior Member

    United States - Midwest
    English - U.S.
    Well, depending on the size of the lake, you could say "shore". Even though another thread says not to do so. If the lake were large enough, I'd say you could say shore.

    Or land. Really I've never referred to the land around a lake enough to really know :)

    It would always be perhaps the boat house, the lakehouse, the dock etc. Never really referred to the land next to a lake that I can think of :)
     
  4. mr cat Senior Member

    English - England
    Lakeside is my punt.
     
  5. Hau Ruck

    Hau Ruck Senior Member

    United States - Midwest
    English - U.S.
    That's a good one. I'll go with his answer.
     
  6. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    Shore for sure! (possibly 'edge')
     
  7. pops91710

    pops91710 Senior Member

    Well, it would have been nice to have had a little context or more defined question. Land immediately around a lake is called the shore, whatever the size of it. Why does a large lake make a difference?
     
  8. SwissPete

    SwissPete Senior Member

    94044 USA
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    And how large is large?
     
  9. George French Senior Member

    English - UK
    Lake Superior..

    GF..
     
  10. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    I would call it the lakeshore, as in Chicago's Lakeshore Drive.
     
  11. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The space immediately round the water's edge is the lake shore.
    It may include a beach.
    Something immediately beside the lake might have the adjective "lakeside".
    (I've translated from the local "lough..." versions for the benefit of the wider readership :))
     
  12. Havfruen Senior Member

    USA
    English - American
    lake shore
     
  13. mr cat Senior Member

    English - England
  14. the green lady New Member

    Ohio, USA
    American English
    Having grown up vacationing each summer along the shores of the Great Lakes, I can say that I never knew of a name specifically for the areas around a large lake, other than shore. "The shores of Lake Superior" or maybe "The Lake-Shore" are my only suggestions.
    I suppose if one wanted to talk about the areas near the Great Lakes, but not the shores, maybe a little farther out, they might say "The Great Lakes and surrounding areas."
    I hope that was useful!
     
  15. Hau Ruck

    Hau Ruck Senior Member

    United States - Midwest
    English - U.S.
    Well...if you are wondering why someone would call a lakefront a "beach" then they'd be correct. There are many along the Great Lakes that refer to the lakeshore as beach. And it even has sand like a coastline beach.

    So...if in fact you are trying to call someone out for referring to it as a beach...They're right :p Just saying.
     
  16. pops91710

    pops91710 Senior Member

    Ah! Lake Superior! In that case the land would be called the United States of America or Canada!:D
     
  17. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    I agree that you can have a beach along a lake (or along a river, for that matter) but I wouldn't call the entire shoreline a beach. Some of it might be rocky. Some of it might have cliffs or steep embankments.

    Since we have no context from GF I'm not sure what he's referring to when he says "land around a (large) lake".
     
  18. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
  19. the green lady New Member

    Ohio, USA
    American English
    I can also attest that the Great Lakes absolutely have beaches, if that is what is in question. I built many a sand-castle on their beaches as a child!
     
  20. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    Waterfront property (if you are discussing real estate).

    Otherwise, shore, beach or shorline as mentioned above.
     
  21. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Could you give us context and a complete sentence, George?;)
     
  22. George French Senior Member

    English - UK

    Of course Loob.


    I opened a new thread as a result of some frustration after participating in the currently active thread "coast/shore/beach/seaside/bank".

    I was trying to get posters away from a sort of tunnel vision (for want of a better word) of the posts in that thread. In both threads we seem to find the terminology that is used to be quite varied.

    I was especially interested in the use of the word coast for some reason. I have located many uses of coast for the land surrounding large lakes, for example:-

    http://www.corpscoasts.us/coasts/ac-gllakesuperior.cfm
    • Wetlands are a rare type of geomorphology on the Lake Superior coast and only comprise about 10% of the shoreline, mostly in sheltered locations.
    • Along the open coast of the lake
    There are many more such usages.

    The use of coast seems to be used for the strip of land close to large lakes as well as the sea.. Using coast for the land bordering a lake also seems to get very negative reactions....

    I think I failed in my objective but nevertheless, my thanks :) to all posters to this thread.


    I still have no answer to what I suppose are my real question.
    • When is the strip of land next to a large body of inland water a coast?
    GF..
     
  23. ribran

    ribran Senior Member

    Austin, Texas
    English - American
    Well, Chicago has the Gold Coast on Lake Michigan...
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2011
  24. George French Senior Member

    English - UK
    Thanks for the info....

    GF..
     
  25. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    As most lakes in the UK can be swum across in 5 or 10 minutes (if you manage not to freeze to death on the crossing), I can't imagine ever using the term 'coast' to refer to one.

    I imagine it's fairly easy to forget you're on a lake when you're standing on the edge of a Great Lake, though.
     
  26. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    Just for the hell of it, I looked up "coast" in Webster's 3rd, and it says that coast is the land near the sea.

    I then looked up "sea" and it is defined as the great bodies of water that cover much of the earth and its dependent saline waters.

    So the Hudson River that runs near my office in Yonkers is "sea" but the Hudson River that runs near my home further north of its outlet to the ocean, is not.

    I also checked to see if there was an exact synonym for "lake" and there is not.

    So "coast" in relation to "lake" would appear to be incorrect (but seemingly widely used).

    Of course usage rides roughshod over dictionaries, and not vice versa, but historically "coast" should not be used in relationship to lakes.

    I don't see how this advances the thread in any meaningful way, but it argues against some of the earlier posts.
     
  27. pops91710

    pops91710 Senior Member

    The Great Lakes are sometimes referred to as the North Coast or "Third Coast" by some citizens of the United States.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_Coast
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Lakes

    Indeed, the Coast Guard has duty stations on the Great Lakes http://www.uscg.mil/d9/
    The Lakes are shared by another sovereign nation, and can be accessed from the Atlantic Ocean. I don't see coastline as being far-fetched as it seems. Just Google Lake Superior Coast or coastline.
     
  28. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    It was just a toothpick thrown into the gears of this discussion. I think I will keep "coast" and "coastal" for land adjacent to ocean water, however.

    When I visit Chicago I often find myself driving on "Lake Shore Drive". I nominate "lake shore" for the function of representing land adjacent to a large body (inland) of water.

    Not surprisingly when I Google "Lake Coast" (in quotation marks) and "Lake Shore" (in quotation marks), Lake Shore is the easy winner.

    Lake Coast = 180,000 entries

    Lake Shore = 11,600,000 enteries.
     
  29. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Lough Neagh, the largest bit of inland water in Britain and Ireland, is barely a stone's throw from me. We don't naturally talk of it having a coast.
    That could be, at least partly, because we have so much of the seaside variety of coast around us.
     
  30. pops91710

    pops91710 Senior Member

    Toothpick? Gee, thanks:(. You can call it whatever you want. It was given for information, not conviction.
     
  31. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    Well there is a word that references land around lakes: interlacustrine

    It is not very commonly used and I suspect it would not be widely understood.

    For that reason I would suggest: water, land interface. :D
     

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