What would you call someone who often changes his mind, her behaviour or vice versa,

Discussion in 'English Only' started by claude23, Feb 24, 2006.

  1. claude23 Senior Member

    normandy
    FRANCE
    Hi,

    How would you call someone who often change his behaviour . I mean from day to another she's quite moody ! How would you call this person who always change her mind ?



    Thank you,

    Claude.
     
  2. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    Indecisive?
     
  3. la reine victoria Senior Member

    Hi Claude.

    You could call her 'temperamental', 'moody', 'unpredictable'.

    If she's always changing her mind she could be 'indecisive', 'uncertain', 'undecided'.

    There are many more adjectives.

    You could simply say, 'She's a woman!' ;)


    Regards
    LRV
     
  4. Mr.Blue

    Mr.Blue Senior Member

    Australia / English
    Streaking , gloomy or sullen ! I think they are close (?) you can use moody it would be my choice to describe a person who changes his mood very often.
     
  5. rsweet

    rsweet Senior Member

    English, North America
    Ouch, la reine victoria! Claude, you could also say that she has unpredictable mood swings.
     
  6. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    But we're not talking about changes in mood - but rather, those who change their mind often.

    There is a difference between the two.
     
  7. nycphotography

    nycphotography Senior Member

    I do be learnin stuff
    John-Paul Miller, NYC
    More adjectives, generally though of as feminine: Tempestuous, Petulant, capricious, flaky, fickle, flighty

    And some masculine equivalents: Mercurial, eccentric.

    And universally: Volatile, temperamental, impulsive

    And for someone who changes for purposes of fitting in or getting along: A cameleon chameleon.
     
  8. maxiogee Senior Member

    imithe
    The questioner asks about both.

    Indecisive for changing one's mind.
    Inconsistent
    for changing one's behaviour.
     
  9. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    Except for "chameleon" and "mercurial," I don't really think any of these work.

    "Tempestuous" to me means "violent, turbulent, stormy."
    "Petulant" means "irritable, peevish, irascible."
    "Eccentric" means "strange, peculiar, unorthodox."
    "Volatile" means "prone to violence, explosive."

    None of the above necessarily refers to someone who changes his mind a lot.
     
  10. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    Oops - I misread the question. I thought she was answering her own question by saying that one who changes his behavior is "moody" (which I think works fine) as a pretext before asking the follow-up question about someone who changes his mind a lot.
     
  11. nycphotography

    nycphotography Senior Member

    I do be learnin stuff
    John-Paul Miller, NYC
    "Tempestuous" to me means "violent, turbulent, stormy."
    People who live violent, turbulent, stormy lives, generally do so because they change the minds and their moods frequently, rather a lot like the weather.

    "Petulant" means "irritable, peevish, irascible."
    People who are peevish tend to be "contrarian", which tends to cause them to change their minds a lot so as to remain contrary.

    "Eccentric" means "strange, peculiar, unorthodox."
    Hmm. Maybe. And yet most "eccentric" men are seen as somewhat capricious, no?

    "Volatile" means "prone to violence, explosive."
    See, tempestuous above.


    In various contexts, in various ways, each of those words may be fitting for a highly variable person. Of course, they have to be applied appropriately to the context and people involved.
     
  12. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Whimsical, if you wish to be lighthearted.
    Devious, if you wish to go towards the other end of the spectrum.

    (Incidentally, I see from the original post that this person also changed his sex.
    And while I'm being incidental, I didn't know of cameleon as an alternative to chameleon until today.)
     
  13. la reine victoria Senior Member


    Sorry to disagree Mr Blue.

    gloomy or sullen refer to a person's mood at a given point in time, not to the fact that they are always behaving differently from one day to the next.

    Is 'streaking' an Australianism? I've never heard it used in the UK, apart from running naked across rugby pitches, etc. :D


    La Reine V
     
  14. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    Agreed. I was just being skeptical because I didn't think that the words on their own referred to the person's variability (cf. "mercurial" and "chameleon").

    Also, as you'll notice in post #10, I had misunderstood the question to be exclusively referring to those who change their mind as opposed to those who change their mood. Including moodswings does put a different spin on things.
     
  15. nycphotography

    nycphotography Senior Member

    I do be learnin stuff
    John-Paul Miller, NYC
    I didn't either! (headed off to edit yet again.......)
     
  16. rsweet

    rsweet Senior Member

    English, North America
    Maybe we should add "fickle" to the mix?
     
  17. Kelly B

    Kelly B Senior Member

    USA English
    ...and erratic.
     
  18. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    Ah...I like "fickle"! :) I think it was on the tip of my tongue - well done, Rsweet!

    Another word that comes to mind is "vacillate," which, albeit not an adjective, works as well.
     
  19. surendipity New Member

    English Canada
    "How would you call someone who often change his behaviour . I mean from day to another she's quite moody ! How would you call this person who always change her mind ?"


    I wouldn't call her at all.
     
  20. CAMullen Senior Member

    Amesbury
    US, English
    Serendipity brings up a good point, Claude. In any European language with which I have a slight familiarity, "How" is often used where an English speaker would say "What." Pardon the lack of punctuation, but "Comment s'appelle," "Como se llama," or "Wie heisst," but in English "What (and not 'how') is it called."
     
  21. la reine victoria Senior Member


    Agreed CAMullen.

    Claude should have said 'How would you describe' not 'how would you call'.

    I think Surendipity was giving a 'tongue-in-cheek' answer. ;) Not worth bothering with such a girl.


    LRV
     

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